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Full text of "Annual report"

Ipswich Public Libra/y 

Ipswich, Massachusetts 



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A^jSTAL REPORT 

imm of ipswich 

M A S S A C H U S E T T S 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/annualreport1975ipsw 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 




1975 ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Town Officials . 2 

Town Meeting Procedures 6 

Annual Town Meeting 8 

Special Town Meeting 

June 9, 1975 30 

Special Town Meeting 

November 17, 1975 39 

Board of Selectmen 45 

Town Manager 46 

Vital Statistics 47 

Ipswich Youth Commission 49 

Assessor's Office 49 

Zoning Board of Appeals 50 

Town Counsel 50 

Treasurer-Collector 51 

Historical Commission 51 

Police Department 52 

Civil Defense 53 

Fire Department 53 

Auxiliary Police 54 

Shellfish Advisory Commission . . 55 

Harbor Master 55 

Shellfish Constable 56 

Board of Health 57 

Veterans' Services 57 

Electric Light Department 58 

Recreation-Parks Department ... 60 

Library 61 

Housing Authority 63 



Essex County 

Mosquito Control 64 

Government Study Commission . 65 

Dog Officer 66 

Conservation Commission 67 

Cemetery Department 68 

Public Works Department 68 

Building Inspector 71 

Water/Sewer Department 71 

Waterways Study Commission . . 72 
Industrial Development 

Commission 73 

Planning Board 74 

Council On Aging 75 

School Committee 77 

Enrollment Statistics 78 

Superintendent of Schools 79 

High School 81 

Ralph C. Whipple Memorial 

Junior High School 82 

Paul F. Doyon 

Memorial School 83 

Winthrop & Baptist Schools 84 

Burley, Shatswell and 

Boone Hall Schools 85 

Director of Curriculum 86 

Pupil Personnel Services 88 

School Building 

Needs Committee 88 

General Information 90 

Ipswich at a Glance 91 



ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AND COMMITTEES 





ELECTED 




Town Moderator 




Board of Selectmen 




Harold E. Shively 


1976 


Charles K. Cobb, Jr., Chairman 


1977 






John M. Pickard 


1976 


School Committee 




Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 


1977 


Paul K. Gahm, Chairman 


1978 


Merle R. Pimentel 


1978 


Walter J. Pojasek 


1976 


AdeleC. Robertson 


1978 


Patricia Manning 


1977 






Annette I. George 


1977 


Housing Authority 




Ernest F. Brockelbank 


1978 


Arthur B. Weagle, Chairman 


1976 


Richard A. Nylen 


1978 


John G. Thatcher, Jr. 


1978 


Deanna S. Cross 


1976 


Harold Bowen 


1979 






Stanley E. Eustace 


1980 


Constable 




Loretta Deitch (State Member) 


1976 


Bernie Spencer 


1976 


Jane Bokron, Director 






APPOINTED 




Finance Committee 




Registrars of Voters 




Elected At Town Meeting 




Barbara J. Rousseau, Chairman 


1976 


Charles C. Dalton, Chairman 1977 


John Kobos 


1977 


Edward L. Nagus 


1976 


Daniel Markos 


1978 


Lawrence J. Pszenny 


1978 


Harold G. Comeau, Clerk 


1977 


Appointed by Moderator 








T. Lincoln Morison, Jr. 


1978 


Board of Assessors 




Robert E. Waite 


1976 


Varnum S. Pedrick 


1978 


Mary P. Conley 


1977 


William R. Lewis 


1976 


Appointed By Selectmen 




John D. Heaphy 


1977 


George Tsoutsouras 


1978 






Thomas Emery 


1976 


Shellfish Constable 




James D. Smyth 


1977 


Richard S. Sheppard 


1977 


Town Manager 




Shellfish Advisory Board 




Leonard J. Silvia 


1976 


Edward Paquin, Chairman 


1976 






Andrew Gianakakis 


1976 


Town Treasurer 




Thomas Dorman 


1976 


George C. Mourikas 


1977 


Joseph Kmiec 


1976 






Joseph Lauderowicz 


1976 


Town Accountant 




James Carter 


1976 


Robert H. Leet 


1976 


Philip Kent 

Richard S. Sheppard, Pro Tern 


1976 



Town Clerk 

Harold G. Comeau 



1978 



Board of Health 

William C. Wigglesworth, 

Chairman 1978 

Edward B. Marsh 1976 

Paul J. Valcour 1977 

Edwin Bronk, Agent 1976 

Cemetery Commission % 

Leon B. Turner, Chairman 1976 

Gordon C. Player 1977 

Nicholas Markos 1978 
Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Supt. 

Civil Defense Director 

John R. Harrigan 1976 

Trust Fund Commissioners 

Mark J. Apsey 1978 

Peter Owsiak 1976 
John T. Beagen (resigned 

5/15/75) 1977 
Elton B. McCausland (to fill the 

unexpired term) 1977 

Planning Board 

George R. Mathey, Chairman 1976 

John T. Beagen 1980 

Jason A. Sokolov 1978 

John P. Prosser 1979 

George H. W. Hayes II 1977 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

Hollie A. Bucklin, Chairman 1976 

Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 1980 

James Theodosopoulos 1977 

William J. Murphy 1979 
Harold Perley (resigned 1 1/06/75)1978 
Sharon Josephson (to fill the 

unexpired term) 1978 

Michael S. Pascucelli, Alternate 1976 
Thadeus Maciejowski, Alternate 1976 

Conservation Commission 

David S. Crestin, Chairman 1978 

William C. Hickling 1978 

William E.George 1978 

Costos Tsoutsouris 1976 

Frederic Winthrop, Jr. 1977 

Dr. Robert L. Goodale 1977 

Sarah L. Weatherall 1976 



Economic & Industrial 
Development Commission 

Paul R. Beswick, Chairman 1977 

Orville Giddings 1980 

Dale E. Dudgeon 1980 

Stephen L. Dietch 1976 

William R. Smith 1978 

Peter W.Williamson 1979 

Joseph Hart 1979 

Albert Harkness 1977 

Town Counsel 

F. Dale Vincent, Jr. 1976 

Building Inspector 

Ralph L. Hebert 1976 

Government Study Committee 

Irving G. Small, Chairman 1976 

Jacob M. Israelsohn 1976 

William H. Smith 1976 

JohnEby 1976 

Gordon Burlingham 1976 

John J. Griffin 1976 

Alfred D. Castantini 1976 

Jessie Girard 1976 

Mary Williamson 1976 

Electric Advisory Board 

John H. Ward, Chairman 1976 

John A. Pechilis 1976 

Carter B. Hart, Sr. 1976 

Alan Whitehead 1976 

Thomas A. Ercoline, Jr. 1976 

Lawrence F. Sweetser 1976 

George H. Bouchard 1976 

Alexander A. Sweenie, Jr. 1976 

George E. Taylor 1976 
Alfred Tobiasz, Manager 

Commuter Rail Committee 

John C. Vincent, Jr., Chairman 1976 

Harold F. Balch 1976 

Leland Carter 1976 

Cornelius Cleary 1976 

James C. McManaway, Jr. 1976 

Robert K. Weatherall 1976 

Doris Greenlaw 1976 

AlanSherr 1976 

Donald Whiston 1976 

Margaret D. Ferrini 1976 

James Berry 1976 



Recreation & Parks Committee 

Charles J. Foley, Chairman 1977 

Elizabeth J . Geanakakis 1 978 

Frederick Garand 1 978 

Eleanor Knowles 1977 
Charles W. Pickard(resigned 

10/27/75) 1976 

James H. Daly, Director 1977 

Historical Commission 

John F. Conley, Chairman 1976 

Barbara C. Emberley 1978 

Louise B. Hodgkins 1978 

George R. Mathey 1978 

Lovell Thompson 1976 

Alice Keenan 1976 

John H.Updike 1977 

Mosquito Control Committee 

Alice Keenan, Chairman 1976 

Lawrence E. Cummings 1976 

Cynthia A. Burns 1976 

Harold Balch 1976 

Herbert Brack 1976 

V. Byron Bennett 1976 

Joan E. Oxner 1976 

Plumbing Inspector 

A.N.D. Hyde 

Alternate Plumbing Inspector 

Rene Rathe 

Wiring Inspector 

Alfred Tobiasz 1976 

Tree Warden 

Armand Michaud 1978 

Council On Aging 

Virginia Cawthron, Chairman 1978 

Joseph H. Whalen 1978 

Nathaniel Quint 1978 

Harold D. Bowen 1977 

Winf red R. Hardy 1977 

Linda Trimmer 1976 

Percy Cheverie 1976 

Insect Pest Control Superintendent 

Armand Michaud 1978 



School Building Needs Committee 

William M. Craft, Chairman 
Deanna Cross 
Gordon Player, Jr. 
Joseph McGee 
Alfred J. Kotek 
Patricia Manning 
Thomas B. Emery 



Youth Commission 

Cathleen McGinely, Director 
Brother Robert Russell, 

Chairman 
Matthew Richards 
Robert Wickstrom 
Thomas Gregory III 
Ann Horsman 
Christopher Reagan 
Susan Cole 



1976 
1978 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1977 
1978 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Ralph M. O'Brien 

Gas Inspector 

Glenfred A. Wanzer 

Bell Ringer 

Harold Bowen 

Inspector of Animals 

John Wegzyn 

Dog Officer 

Maura P. Quinn 

Harbor Master 

Pete George 



1976 



1976 



1976 



1976 



1976 



Library Trustees 

Phyllis E. Bruce, Chairman 1976 

Thomas A. Johnson 1978 

Daniel W. Poor, Jr. 1978 

Alice Keenan 1978 

Kathryn G. Klinger 1976 

AnnDurey 1976 

Louise W. Sweetser 1977 

Rev. Robert F. Dobson 1977 
William E. Waitte, Jr. (resigned 

7/15/75) 1977 
Rae Paul (to fill the 

unexpired term) 1977 
Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian 



Waterways Study Commission Bicentennial Committee 

Walter G. Petrowicz, Chairman 1976 Robin Carter, Chairman 

Charles D. Bayley 1976 Jean Bucklin 

Pierre Doucette 1976 Louis Geoffrion 

Stanley Eustace 1976 Glenn Visser 

Kenneth W. Nokes 1976 Leland Carter 

Robert D. Todd, Jr. 1976 John Conley 

Howard G. Womack 1976 James Grimes 



Town Meeting Procedures 

Prepared by Moderator Harold Shively and the 
Ipswich League of Women Voters 

Eligibility: All Ipswich citizens whose names are on the voting list are 
eligible to participate in the Town Meeting. Registration closes 20 days 
before the Annual Town Meeting and 14 days before a Special Town 
Meeting. 

Participation: Any member of the Town Meeting may speak. When a 
person wishes to speak, he/she should stand up and be recognized by the 
Moderator. The speaker must state his/her name and, if employed by 
another interested in the matter under discusion, shall disclose this fact 
before speaking thereon. 

No one is to speak impertinently or beside the question, superfluously 
or tediously. No one is to indulge in discussion of personalities or use 
indecent language. No one is to disturb another's speech except for a 
point of order or a question of privilege. 

If anyone wishes to question another, he should address the questions 
to the moderator. 

Town Meeting Time by Richard B. Johnson, et al., is the source of the 
rules of procedure for conducting Town Meeting. 

Warrant: The warrant is drawn by the Board of Selectmen. Any citizen 
may put an article on the warrant by simply writing it out and having 10 
registered voters sign it with their names and addresses. This is submitted 
to the Town Clerk before the warrant closes. 

The warrant closes at least 14 days before Town Meeting and shall have 
been open for at least 7 days before that. The warrant must be published 
at least 7 days before Town Meeting. The Finance Committee holds a 
public hearing on all warrant articles except those providing for the elec- 
tion of officers. 

Quorum: 5 per cent of the registered voters of the Town make a quorum. 

Order of Consideration: All articles shall be acted upon in the order in 
which they appear in the warrant unless the meeting determines other- 
wise by a majority vote. 

Amendments: The amendment may consist of adding, deleting, or substi- 
tuting words in the motion. The amendment should be in writing. This 
saves time and gives the Town Counsel an opportunity to assess the legal 
implications. Time will be taken to put the amendment in writing before 
voting if the proposer has not done this. 

The first amendment to a motion is called the primary amendment. It 
may itself be amended. An amendment to the primary amendment is called 



the secondary amendment. Not more than one primary and one secondary 
amendment may be pending at one time. 

A motion to amend requires a majority vote, even though the motion to 
be amended may require a two-thirds majority or more. 

Subsidiary Motions: A motion to postpone indefinitely means the article 
will not be acted on. No article can be automatically carried over to an- 
other warrant. 

A motion to limit or extend the limits of debate requires a second and a 
two-thirds vote. It may not be debated. 

Vote: If the initial decision of the Moderator on the outcome of the vote 
on any question is doubted, and if at least 7 voters so signify by rising 
and standing in their places, the Moderator shall direct the vote be taken 
again. After a vote has been taken in response to a challenge and the re- 
sult of the second vote has been determined by the Moderator and an- 
nounced, no further challenge to the result shall be permitted. 

Some kinds of articles require more than a simple majority vote to pass; 
the most common example is an article which will require bonding and 
which requires a two-thirds majority to pass. It is customary for the Moder- 
ator to state any such requirement before the vote is taken. 

Special Town Meeting: The Selectmen may call a Special Town Meeting, 
and, if they receive a request signed by 200 registered voters in the Town, 
they shall call a Special Town Meeting within 45 days. All subjects re- 
quested by the petition are inserted in the warrant. Other articles for the 
warrant of a Special Town Meeting are included if submitted in writing 
by 100 registered voters. Notice of the time, place and subjects for the 
Special Town Meeting must be issued 7 days before the meeting. Other 
rules for procedure are generally the same as for Annual Town Meeting. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL MARCH 4, 1975 

ESSEX, SS 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County. 

GREETINGS: 

In the Name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby 
directed to notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich qualified to vote 
in town affairs to meet at the Ipswich High School in said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE THIRD DAY OF MARCH 1975 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening to act on the following articles viz: 

Moderator Harold Shively called the Meeting to order at 7:30 p.m., 
announcing that a quorum was present. The final count had 1,337 voters 
in attendance. 

The following tellers were appointed by the Moderator: Rainer Broekel, 
John Griffin, Bruce Paul, James Gallop, Roger Burke, Kathy Moore, 
Elizabeth Dorman, Richard Durand. Mary Williamson was Assistant 
Moderator in the Cafeteria for the overflow, assisted by Eleanor Nelson 
as Official Runner. 

The Salute to the Flag was led by Moderator Shively. Town Clerk Harold 
Comeau read the opening and closing paragraphs of the Warrant and the 
Constable's Return. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Joseph Navarro moved that visitors 
and students be allowed to sit along the front wall. Seconded. Unanimous 
voice vote. 



Article 1.: To fix the salary and compensation of all elected town officers. 

Mr. Navarro moved that the salary and compensation of all 
elected officers be fixed as in the 1975/76 budget. Seconded. Finance 
Committee recommended. Motion carried on voice vote. 

m 

Article 2.: To choose the following officers, viz: 
Moderator for one (1) year 
Two (2) Selectmen for three (3) years 
Constable for one (1) year 

Three (3) members of the School Committee for three (3) years 
One (1) member of the School Committee for one(l) year 
One ( 1 ) member of the Housing Authority for five (5) years 

And to vote "Yes" or "No" to the following questions: 

Question No. 1: 

"Shall licenses be granted in this Town for the operation, holding or 
conducting a game commonly called Beano?" 



Question No. 2: 

"To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Charter (Chapter 620 
of the Acts of 1966) by deleting therefrom Section 1, "Town Meeting," 
and substituting therefore the following section: 

Section 1. Town Meeting. The Annual Town Meeting of the Town of 
Ipswich for the transaction of all business except the election of such 
officers and the determination of such matters as are by law to be deter- 
mined by ballot shall be held on such date as the Town shall provide by 
By-law consistent with the provisions of the General Laws as amended. 
That part of the Annual Town Meeting devoted to the election of officers 
and to take action on such matters as are by law to be determined by 
ballot shall be held within thirty days of the Annual Town Meeting, and 
the time and place of holding such election and vote shall be stated in the 
Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting." 

The above articles to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling 
places as follows: 

Precinct 1 Ipswich Junior High School, Green Street 

Precinct 2 Winthrop School, Central Street 

Precinct 3 Ipswich High School, High Street 

Precinct 4 Burley School, Mount Pleasant Avenue 
on Monday, March 10, 1975. The polls shall open at 10 a.m and close at 
8 p.m. 

No action required. 

Article 3.: To choose one member of the Finance Committee to serve 
for three (3) years. 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Charles Dalton moved that 
Lawrence Pszenny be nominated to the Finance Committee to serve for 
three years. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 4: To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee, 
and raise and appropriate and transfer money for the ensuing year, in- 
cluding the compensation of elected town officers. 

Moved by Mr. Dalton that the sum of $2,132,350.71 be raised 
an appropriated for the purposes hereinafter designated: 

I. For the Operating Budget $2,968,742.00 

of this: 

$103,000.00 from Overlay Surplus to the Reserve Fund 
33,000.00 from Sewer Receipts Reserve 
1,163.04 from County Dog Refund 
350,000.00 from Surplus Revenue 
8,772.00 from Highway Aid 
4,031 .25 from Library Aid Reserve 
10,500.00 from Cemetery Perpetual Care Income 
925.00 from Cemetery Flower Fund Income 



Also for the Operating Budget we recommend that $325,000.00 be 
appropriated from the Revenue Sharing Trust Fund for the following 
purposes: 

$22,000.00 for Planning Board Expenses 
15,000.00 for Police Department Capital 
92,000.00 for Sanitation Composite Contract 
40,000.00 for Highway Division Capital 
24,000.00 for Equipment Maintenance Expenses 
22,000.00 for Snow and Ice Control Expenses 
10,000.00 for Snow and Ice Rentals 
10,000.00 for Forestry Department Capital 
17,000.00 for Cemetery Buildings Department Capital 
30,000.00 for Package Insurance 
30,000.00 for Workmen's Compensation Insurance 
13,000.00 for Debt Service - specifically principal payments on 
Sewer Bond 
Total: $325,000.00 

Also moved that the budget category 42, RESERVE FUND of 
the Finance Committee Report, be amended as follows: by deleting the 
sum of "$65,000.00" as recommended for 1975/76 and substituting 
therefore the sum of "$228,000.00." 

Available funds are $836,391.29, leaving $2,132,350.71 to be 
raised and assessed. 

II. For the School Budget to be raised and appropriated as hereinafter 
designated: $3,568,302.00 

Administration $ 110,044.00 

Instruction 2,616,685.00 

Other School Services & Athletics 408,206.00 

Operating & Maintenance of Plant 349,28 1 .00 

Fixes Charges 34,299.00 

Acquisition of Fixed Assets 49,537.00 

Programs with other Districts 250.00 

m 

The total recommended budget is: $6,537,044.00 

The total available funds are: 5 1 1 ,391 .29 

Revenue Sharing Trust Fund appropriations are: 325,000.00 

The total to be raised and assessed is: $5,700,652.71 

Seconded. Mr. Dalton explained changes made in the Budget: 1) After 
discussing the proposed purchase of the Rust building for a Fire Station, 
the Finance Committee agreed with the Selectmen's request and removed 
$100,000.00 earmarked for the Revenue Sharing Trust Fund to purchase 
and renovate the building, leaving $325,000.00 in the Trust Fund; 2) 
since the Town will receive $163,000.00 in Chapter 766 reimbursement, 



10 



the Finance Committee suggested that the School Committee reduce its 
budget by this figure and it was so agreed. In the event the State does 
not make this payment, the Finance Committee agreed to increase the 
Reserve Fund by $163,000.00, transfer $103,000.00 instead of $65,000.00, 
and add $125,000.00 free cash to the Reserve Fund. The money will be 
transferred only if the state payment is not made. Mr. Dalton commented 
that this was a bookkeeping technique only, and the criticisms of the 
School Committee m the Finance Report are still appropriate. He expressed 
the Finance Committee's pessimism about the tax rate, and optimism that 
labor negotiations will be successfully completed. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended this article. Mr Gahm for the School Committee praised 
the Finance Committee's spirit of cooperation this year, and mentioned 
the rising costs. John Donovan stated that the School Committee was 
irresponsible in giving Mr. Stella a salary increase when the unemployment 
situation is so bad; he also criticized the Committee's performance, feels 
we should have better schools without excessive costs. On the vote, the 
motion passed with 727 in favor, 406 opposed. 



1. Operating Budget 
General Government 



1. MODERATOR: 
Salary 
Expenses 
Total 



Expended Expended Request Recommend 

1972 1973 1973-74* 1974-75 1974-75 



100 

25 

125 



100 



100 



100 

40 

140 



100 

25 

125 



100 

25 

125 



2. SELECTMEN: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



6,390 6,114 6,804 10,722 6,561 

2,545 3,004 3,136 3,560 3,560 

533 67 

8,935 9.651 10,007 14,282 10,121 



FINANCE COMMITTEE: 

Salaries & Wages 100 

Expenses 889 

Total 989 



136 125 100 150 

1,106 1,044 1,155 .1,390 

1,242 1,169 1,255 1,540 



4. PLANNING BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Planning Consultants: 

Reinbursable 

General 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



500 531 552 600 600 

3,716 3,862 16T395 1,800 1,050 

10,000 10,000 

6,000 6,000 
100 75 25 

4,316 4,468 16,972 18,400 17,650 



5. ELECTIONS & REGISTRATION 
Salaries & Wages 10,566 

Expenses 3,800 

Total 14,366 



4,074 5,761 11,200 10,500 

2,047 3,892 4,100 3,600 

6,121 9,653 15,300 14,100 



11 



Expended Expended 



6. APPEALS BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



Request Recommend 



1972 

190 
163 

353 



1973 1973-74* 1974-75 1974-75 



175 

166 

56 

397 



200 

174 

69 

443 



225 
210 

435 



225 
210 

435 



TOWN MANAGER: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



31,703 33,842 34,650 36,379 36,379 

13,580 12,509 15,125 15,650 15,650 

280 3,336 39 180 100 

45,563 49,687 49,814 52,209 52,129 



ACCOUNTANT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



24,886 25,843 26,877 31,301 31,301 

6,164 5,796 8,483 6,830 6,750 

244 -- -- 12,550 12,550 

31,294 31,639 35,360 50,681 50,601 



9. TREASURER & COLLECTOR 



Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
total 

10. ASSESSORS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



27,763 

3,633 

250 

31,646 



22,692 
2,831 

25,523 



29,909 31,062 35,068 34,468 

2,847 3,893 5,000 4,302 

828 422 900 700 

33,584 34,377 40,968 39,470 



23,253 26,228 27,377 26,777 

2,411 3,793 4,019 3,715 

636 49 500 500 

26,300 30,130 31,896 30,992 



11. TOWN CLERK 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



11,515 12,568 12,303 15,483 12,721 

844 778 1,089 1,365 1,295 

325 850 775 

12,359 13,346 13,717 17,698 14,791 



12. LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 10 
Town Counsel - Court 
Other Counsel 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Total 11 

13. INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 



>01 


6,238 


5,982 


6,889 


6,889 


" 


2,550 


2,150 


4,000 


2,500 


" 


595 


4,376 


1,000 


2,500 


77 


140 


555 


330 


280 


i78 


9,523 


13,063 


12,219 


12,169 


75 


50 


100 


100 


100 


53 


8 


1,067 


150 


150 


- 


125 


- 


-- 


-- 


28 


183 


1,167 


250 


250 



14. HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Expenses 77 



21 



440 



200 



200 



12 



Expended Expended Request Recommend 

1972 1973 1973-74* 1974-75 1974-75 



15. CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 391 

Expenses 434 

Capital Outlay 575 

Total 1,400 



498 


469 


840 


650 


542 


937 


1,080 


905 


3,191 


1,809 


11,200 


7,100 


4,231 


3,215 


13,120 


8,655 



16. 


HISTORIC DISTRICT COMM: 












Expenses 


-- 


-- 


340 


150 


150 


17. 


YOUTH COMMISSION: 














Salaries & Wages 


1,375 


8,451 


12,798 


12,136 


10,450 




Expenses 


4,319 


7,464 


10,782 


10,150 


9,350 




Capital Outlay 


1,297 


-- 


- 


1,055 


660 




Total 


6,991 


15,915 


23,580 


23,341 


20,460 


18. 


BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE: 












Salary 




- 


-- 


750 


600 




Expenses 


-- 


-- 


-- 


16,050 


11,400 




Total 


-- 


-- 


-- 


16,800 


12,000 


19. 


BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE: 












Salary 


-- 


- 


- 


540 


500 




Expenses 








625 


500 




Total 








1,165 


1,000 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

195,143 206,408 244,587 310,494 286,838 

PUBLIC SAFETY 



20. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT: 












Salaries & Wages 












Chief 












Base 


13,961 


17,536 


16,561 


18,851 


18,815 


Incentive 


1,466 


2,597 


2,597 


2,808 


1,404 


Holiday 


491 


730 


757 


793 


793 


Total 


15,918 


20,863 


19,915 


22,416 


21,012 


Lieutenant 


-- 


- 


- 


14,000 


-- 


Sergeants (3) 












Base 


30,704 


32,134 


30,508 


34,902 


34,902 


Incentive 


1,509 


2,571 


1,571 


1,736 


868 


Holiday 


1,300 


1,353 


1,403 


1,471 


1,471 


Total 


33,513 


35,058 


33,482 


38,109 


37,241 


Patrolmen (13)(14) 












Base 


117,884 


122,969 (13, 118,302 (14) 143,854 


143,854 


Incentive 


5,881 


7,064 


7,064 


13,648 


6,824 


Holiday 


4,712 


5,113 


4,405 


6,029 


6,029 


Total 


128,477 


135,146 


129,771 


163,531 


156,707 


Patrolmen- New(1) 












Base 


-- 


3,501 


8,252 


9,369 


9,369 


Holiday 


- 


165 


275 


395 


395 


Total 


- 


3,666 


8,527 


9,764 


9,764 



13 



Expended Expended Request Recommend 

1972 1973 1973-74* 1974-75 1974-75 

Overtime 11,472 18,313 13,048 12,000 10,000 

Shift differential 2,188 2,112 2,030 2,300 2,300 

Court Fees 5,997 6,223 5,673 7,000 6,500 

Other Salaries 3,274 3,386 3,344 5,485 5,435 

Total Salaries 200,839 224,767 215,790 274,605 248,959 

Expenses 11,156 10,146 11,164 13,550 13,235 

Capital Outlay 9,267 9,890 1,498 9,925 8,825 

Total 221,262 244,803 228,452 298,080 271,019 

21. FIRE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 

Chief 

Base 13,961 17,114 17,461 17,830 17,830 

Incentive -- 400 400 400 400 

Holiday 491 722 727 752 752 

Total 14,452 18,236 18,588 18,982 18,982 
Captains (3) 

Base 30,256 31,176 31,034 33,015 33,015 

Holiday 1,300 1,275 1,307 1,392 1,392 

Total 31,556 32,451 32,341 34,407 -34,407 
Firefighters (12) 

Base 108,797 (12) 108,734 (14) 1 14,407 132,620 132,620 

Incentive -- 400 400 

Holiday 4,313 4,628 4,707 5,590 5,590 

Total 113,110 113,362 119,513 138,610 138,210 
Firefighters - New (2 - July) 

Base -- 10,511 17,048 

Holiday -- 457 721 

Total -- 10,968 17,769 

Overtime 7,496 8,110 5,334 10,000 7,000 

Call Lieutenants (5) 1,400 2,100 2,100 2,100 2,100 

Call Operator (1) 600 700 700 700 700 

Call Men (26) 12,328 13,900 16,500 15,600 15,600 

Other Salaries 953 -- -- 200 

Total Salaries 181,895 199,827 212,845 220,599 216,999 

Expenses 11,133 8,244 11,204 11,700 10,200 

Capital Outlay 1,995 6,316 4,459 3,345 3,195 

Total 194,983 214,387 228,508 235,644 230,394 

22. CIVIL DEFENSE: 

Salaries & Wages 1,000 1,381 1,390 1,725 1,725 

Expenses 1,009 926 1,103 1,000 1,070 

Capital Outlay 1,188 820 655 750 750 

Total 3,197 3,127 3,148 3,475 3,545 

23. SHELLFISH: 

Salaries & Wages 9,387 9,894 10,229 10,500 10,500 

Expenses 5,483 1,438 10,611 7,500 7,150 

Capital Outlay -- 400 400 

Total 14,870 11,332 20,840 18,400 18,050 



14 



Expended Expended 



1972 



1973 1973-74' 



Request Recommend 
1974-75 1974-75 



24. HARBORS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

25. BUILDING INSPECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 



2,000 
998 



2,333 
1,175 



2,998 3,508 



TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 



4,287 
591 

4,878 

439,190 



4,603 

1,112 

75 

5,790 



10,167 

1,040 

25 

11,232 



2,000 

1,120 

685 

3,805 



10,000 
1,165 



11,165 
482,437 495,688 570,569 



HEALTH & SANITATION 



PUBLIC WORKS 



2,000 

1,070 

995 

4,065 



11,580 
1,065 

12,645 

539,718 



26. 


HEALTH AGENT: 














Salaries & Wages 


14,530 


14,636 


15,907 


14,750 


16,431 




Expenses 


9,201 


10,368 


11,806 


10,950 


10,025 




Capital Outlay 


- 


756 


767 


-- 






Total 


23,731 


25,760 


28,480 


25,700 


26,456 


27. 


OUTSIDE CONTRACTS: 














Garbage Collection 


27,000 


24,813 


30,750 


18,500 


-- 




Rubbish Collection 


52,000 


49,208 


58,333 


47,000 


-- 




Dump Maintenance 


34,150 


30,741 


43,617 


26,500 


-- 




Sanitation Composite 














Contract 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


92,000 




Recycling Collection 


-- 


-- 


-• 


1,000 


1,000 




Spring & Fall Cleaning 


- 


- 


-- 


1,300 


1,300 




Total 


113,150 


104,762 


132,700 


94,300 


94,300 


TOTAL HEALTH & 














SANITATION 


136,881 


130,522 


161,180 


120,000 


120,756 


28. 


VETERANS' BENEFITS 
Salaries & Wages 


.. 












Expenses 


118,452 


105,992 


160,873 


185,000 


172,000 




Total 


118,452 


105,992 


160,873 


185,000 


172,000 



29. 


ADMINISTRATION 














Salaries & Wages 


11,924 


12,530 


12,811 


12,949 


12.949 




Expenses 


1,470 


1,889 


2,826 


3,390 


2,490 




Total 


13,394 


14,419 


15,637 


16,339 


15,439 


30/ 


BUILDING DIVISION 
a) Town Hall 














Salaries & Wages 


6,531 


6,890 


7,069 


7,475 


7,475 




Expenses 


6,041 


6,309 


6,394 


8,800 


8.800 




Capital Outlay 


6,818 


-- 


5,000 


-- 


-- 




Total 


19,390 


13,199 


18,463 


16,275 


16.275 



15 



Expended Expended Request Recommend 
1972 1973 1973-74' 1974-75 1974-75 



31. 



b)Memorial Building 












Expenses 


2.566 


1,324 


2.927 


4.175 


3,525 


Capital Outlay 


-- 


- 


-- 


300 


-- 


Total 


2.566 


1,324 


2,927 


4.475 


3,525 


c) Sewer Buiidings 












Expense 


479 


478 


523 


725 


725 


d)Fire Building 












Expenses 


2.120 


2.506 


5.516 


4,525 


4,225 


Capital Outlay 


400 


15.886 


17.386 


- 


-- 


Total 


2.520 


18.392 


22,902 


4.525 


4,225 


e) Town Garage 












Expense 


2.190 


2.117 


2,881 


3.485 


3.485 


Capital Outlay 


- 


750 




-- 


- 


Total 


2.190 


2.867 


2.881 


3,485 


3,485 


f) Cemetery Buildings 












Expenses 


260 


284 


578 


565 


565 


Capital Outlay 


-- 


369 


370 


16,000 


4.000 


Total 


260 


653 


948 


16,565 


4.565 


g)Park Buildings 












Expenses 


657 


886 


1.307 


2.100 


- 


Peat 


2,365 


2.255 


2.528 


-- 


- 


Capital Outlay 


- 


- 


-- 


-- 


- 


Total 


3.022 


3.141 


3.835 


2.100 


- 


h)Library Buildings 












Expenses 


1.963 


2.218 


2.626 


3.680 


3.680 


Capital Outlay 


1.660 


390 


600 


-- 


- 


Total 


3.623 


2.518 


3,226 


3.680 


3.680 


Total 


34.050 


42.572 


58.233 


51.830 


36.480 


HIGHWAY DIVISION 












Salaries & Wages 


67.916 


72.751 


76.853 


81.397 


80.897 


Expenses 


90.417 


107.363 


117,404 


124.510 


118.610 


Capital Outlay 


18.149 


11.040 


27.500 


29.400 


24.400 


Total 


176.482 


191.154 


221.757 


235.307 


223.907 



32. EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



33. SNOW & ICE CONTROL 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Rental 
Total 

34. FORESTRY 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



16.100 


17.395 


18.247 


19.438 


19,438 


36.498 


33.599 


40.437 


44.005 


45.005 


763 


900 


500 


-- 


-- 


53.361 


51.895 


59.184 


63.443 


64.443 


18.026 


3.658 


24.813 


15.000 


15.000 


20.616 


10.621 


23.733 


20.900 


20.900 


14.418 


1.308 


16.692 


10.000 


10.000 


53.060 


15.587 


65.278 


45.900 


45.900 


34.122 


37.941 


39.193 


44.372 


41,872 


14.214 


13.065 


10.557 


14.175 


12.795 


600 


6.720 


18.405 


8.450 


8.450 


49.936 


57,726 


68.155 


66.997 


64.117 



16 



35. 



SEWER 




Salaries & Wages 


17,517 


Expenses 


8,423 


Total 


25,940 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 



36. 



Expended Expended Request Recommend 

1972 1973 1973-74* 1974-75 1974-75 

18,630 18,726 20,329 20,104 

9,348 10,847 15,783 14,485 

27,978 29,573 36,112 34,589 

406,223 401,331 517,817 515,928 484,875 



37. 



38. 



39. 



40. 



RECREATION & PARKS 












Salaries & Wages 


46,444 


53,680 


54,374 


62,964 


59,446 


Expenses 


14,364 


13,983 


12,542 


17,845 


15,745 


Capital Outlay 


4,337 


6,385 


7,775 


15,050 


8,800 


Total 


65,145 


74,048 


74,691 


95,859 


83,991 


CEMETERIES 












Salaries & Wages 


39,102 


47,145 


52,497 


52,685 


51,235 


Expenses 


9,545 


6,101 


9,269 


9,619 


7,527 


Capital Outlay 


4,920 


975 


3,025 


8,690 


4,090 


Total 


53,567 


54,221 


64,791 


70,994 


62,852 


INSURANCE 












Motor Vehicle 








7,000 


7,000 


Workmens Compensation 26,398 


17,743 


23,139 


30,000 


30,000 


Package Insurance 


36,441 


35,647 


22,659 


30,000 


30,000 


Public Official Bonds 


616 


565 


870 


700 


700 


Fire & Police 


- 


- 


3,000 


- 




Total 


63,455 


53,955 


49,668 


67,700 


67,700 


BENEFITS 












Military Service Credits 


8,348 


9,306 


10,694 


10,000 


10,000 


County Retirement System 166,719 


242,195 


242,195 


250,000 


250,000 


Health & Life 


45,740 


63,351 


74,492 


65,000 


65,000 


Total 


220,807 


314,852 


327,381 


325,000 


325,000 


DEBT SERVICE 












Payment of Interest 


49,819 


59,271 


72,915 


64,153 


64,153 


Payment of Principal 


338,000 


294,000 


289,000 


331, COO 


331,000 


Total 


387,819 


353,271 


361,915 


395,153 


395,153 



UNCLASSIFIED 



41. ENCUMBRANCES 

42. RESERVE FUND 

43. BOND ISSUE COSTS 

44. INTEREST ON TAX 

ANTICIPATION 
Total 

TOTAL OPERATING 
BUDGET 



45. LIBRARY 

Salaries & Wages 



6,862 


26,348 


23,428 


- 


-- 


-- 


16,714 


66,869 


-- 


60,000 


2,445 


-- 


5,000 


2,500 


2,500 


25,056 


31,523 


8,805 


12,500 


12,500 


34,363 


74,585 


104,102 


15,000 


75,000 



2,121,315 2,251,622 2,562,6932,671,697 2,613,883 

II. LIBRARY 

45,164 47,357 53,426 57,825 57,825 



17 



Expended Expended Request 

1972 1973 1973-74* 1974-75 



Expenses 


14,489 


18,557 


16,740 


22,150 


22,100 


Capital Outlay 


-- 


803 


1,700 


1,500 


1,500 


Total 


59,653 


66,717 


71,866 


81,475 


81,425 




III. SCHOOL 








46. SCHOOL 












Administration 


70,882 


67,385 


86,642 


87,115 


87,115 


Instruction 


2,017,300 


2,189,089 2,140,7402,512,058 


2,512,058 


Other School Services 












& Athletics 


311,440 


334,633 


346,074 


369,590 


369,590 


Oper. & Maint. of Plant 


251,154 


247,435 


243,174 


281,327 


281,327 


Fixed Charges 


36,632 


12,751 


37,109 


34,299 


34,299 


Acquisition of Fixed 












Assets 


32,206 


33,376 


43,285 


51,336 


51,336 


Programs with Other 












Districts 


5,686 


4,201 


1,202 


250 


250 



Encumbrances from 

Other Years 50,409 13,031 6,414 

Total 2,775,709 2,901,901 2,904,6403,335,975 3,335,975 

TOTALOF BUDGETS I, II 

&III 4,956,677 5,220,240 5,539,1996,089,147 6,031,283 

EXPENDITURE BY ARTICLE: 

Whittier Vocational 60,725 308,543 313,846 291,289 291,289 

*NOTE: July 1, 1973 - June 30, 1974 figures include actual expenditures for the 
period July 1, 1973 to December 31, 1973 and the Balance Remaining (unused 
appropriation) for the period January 1, 1974 to June 30, 1974. 



Article 5: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue for the financial years beginning July 1, 1975, 
and June 30, 1976, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Moved by John Pickard that the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue for the financial years beginning 
July 1, 1975, and June 30, 1976, in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. Seconded. Finance 
Committee recommended. Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 6: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the current expense of the Water Department, the same to be paid 



18 



from revenues by the Water Department during the fiscal year 1976, and 
to see what action the Town will take in regard to surplus funds. 

Moved by Edward Kozeneski that the Town appropriate $247,800.00 
for current expenses of the Water Department; the same to be paid from 
revenue received by the Water Department in the year 1975/76, and further 
to transfer from operational surplus $15,557.58 to the Plant and Invest- 
ment Account. Seconded. Finance Committee approved. Motion carried 
on voice vote. 

Article 7: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum to 
be made available for said purpose from the Chamber of Commerce. 

Harris Smith moved that $700.00 be appropriated to be used in 
conjunction with a matching sum of the Chamber of Commerce of Ipswich 
for the purpose of the promotion of the Town of Ipswich. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried 
on a voice vote. 

Article 8: To see what action the Town will take to the transfer of any 
surplus funds in the Electric Light Department. 

Edwin Damon, Jr., moved that this article be indefinitely post- 
poned. Seconded. The Electric Department has a surplus of $20,000.00 
this year and on the recommendation of Manager Alfred Tobiasz, the 
Board of Selectmen as Electric Light Commissioners voted unanimously 
to return this sum to the operating account, feeling it would be better 
utilized in offsetting a rate increase. Finance Committee recommended. 
Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 9: To see what sum the Town will raise and appropriate to 
pay unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid. 

Town Manager Silvia moved that the sum of $6,501.61 be ap- 
propriated to pay unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remaining 
unpaid: 



Department • Vendor 

YOUTH COMMISSION: 
Cameracraft, Inc. 

ASSESSORS: 

Branbar Publishing Co. 
Ravenwood Spring Water Co., Inc. 
Singer Business Machines 
Essex South Registry of Deeds 

WATER OPERATIONS: 
Xerox Corporation 
Precision Control Products, Inc. 



Year 


Amount 


Total 


1973 


$ 46.00 


$ 46.00 


1974 


12.10 




1974 


8.00 
73.00 






26.60 


119.70 




82.00 






226.94 


308.94 



19 



HEALTH-PLUMBING INSPECTOR: 



A. N.D.Hyde 




475.00 




Rene J. Rathe 




47.50 


522.50 


PLANNING BOARD: 








Metcalf & Eddy, Inc. 




$ 2,077.00 


$ 2,077.00 


SCHOOL DEPARTMENT: 








Educators Publishing Co. 


1972 


18.70 




Suburban Propane Gas Co. 


1972 


35.64 




Mancib Company 


1972 


10.59 




Scholastic Book Company 


1972 


25.00 




New England Film Center 




65.95 




Magna Music 




7.02 




Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 




78.00 




Arts & Crafts 




21.50 




Sargent Welch Scientific Co. 




22.34 




R.R. Bowker Company 




32.50 




Educational Methods, Inc. 




74.50 




Damon Educational Co. 




18.79 




Westinghouse Learning Corp. 




5.95 




F.W. Woolworth & Co. 




5.00 




Pyrofax Gas Company 




8.50 




National Textbook Co. 




5.50 




Lynn Hardware Company 




18.00 




Broadhead Garrett Co. 




23.57 




L.B. Moody Company 




61.46 




F.W. Faxon Company 




33.00 




American Education Publications 




24.25 




Viking Press, Inc. 




15.26 




Interstate Printers 




2.43 




G.B. Putnam Company 




4.10 




Sundance Distributors 




20.45 




Learning Corp. of America 




30.00 




Story House Corp. 




18.27 




Carl Fischer, Inc. 




138.49 




Xerox Corporation 




168.90 




Valiant Instructional Co. 




15.57 




Star Paper Co. 




633.26 




A & A Paperback Dist. 




448.17 


2,090.66 


Pickering Oil Company 


1973-74 


591.66 




Sargent Welch Scientific Co. 


1973-74 


103.57 




Star Paper Company 




66.74 




Turtox Cambasco 




14.91 




A & A Paperback Dist. 




559.93 


1,336.81 






$ 


6,501.61 



Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Mr. Gahm explained that 
most of the School's unpaid bills were caused by delayed shipping, mis- 
placed orders, etc. A four-fifths vote was necessary. The motion carried 
with 987 voting in the affirmative, 72 in the negative. 

Article 10: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for construction of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 



20 



Mr. Navarro moved that the Town appropriate the sum of 
$39,000.00 .for construction of roads under Chapter 90 and said appropria- 
tion be raised by transferring $14,739.00 of available funds from Chapter 
1 140, Acts of 1973, and $24,261 .00 of available funds from Chapter 825, 
Section 1 of the Acts of 1974. Seconded. Finance Committee recommends. 
Carried on voice vote. 

Article 11: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for the Maintenance of roads under Chapter 90 of the General 
Laws. 

Mr. Kozeneski moved that the sum of $4,500.00 be raised and 
appropriated for the maintenance of roads under Chapter 90 of the General 
Laws. Seconded. Roger Burke asked if this would increase the work 
being done on Linebrook Road; Town Manager replied that it was not 
planned to go further than Howe Street this year. Motion carried on a 
voice vote. 

Article 12: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money 
to cover the Town's share of the annual operating and debt service ex- 
penses of the Whittier Regional Vocation Technical High School District. 

Edward Penney moved that the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $263,612.00 to cover the Town's share of the annual operating 
and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical 
High School District. Seconded. Mr. Penny remarked that this amount 
is a decrease from last year's appropriation of $291,289. The total Whittier 
budget this year is $6,757,094.00. The Board of Selectmen and the Finance 
Committee recommended. Mrs. Conley for the Finance Committee stated 
that budget procedures have been improved and though the budget has 
been pared down, the administration stili has a way to go. The school 
fills a need by supplying programs not available elsewhere, but it is still 
too early to evaluate these services. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 13: To hear and act upon the reports of committees, and to 
continue such committees as the Town may vote to continue. 

Moved by John Vincent that the report of the MBTA Study 
Committee be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unani- 
mous voice vote. 

Moved by John Conley that the report of the Historic District 
Study Committee be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by Irving Small that the report of the Government Study 
Committee be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unani- 
mous voice vote. 

Moved by Alice Keenan that the report of the Mosquito Con- 
trol Committee be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 



21 



Moved by William Craft of the School Building Needs Com- 
mittee that its report be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

Chairman George Mathey read the report of the Planning Board 
(which did not appear in the Town Report). No action was required. 

Article 14: To see if the Town will vote to name the New Electric Light 
Building on High Street or take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the Town name the new Electric Light 
Building at 222 High Street in tribute to, and in memory of, George A. 
Schofield. Seconded. Mr. Silvia introduced Robert Bamford who gave a 
biography of Mr. Schofield and made an amendment to the motion, 
that the Moderator appoint a committee of five with authority to erect a 
small stone with a bronze plaque upon it setting forth Mr. Schofield's 
accomplishments in the vicinity of the new building, and that the sum of 
$1,000.00 be raised and appropriated for this purpose. This amendment 
was ruled out of order by the Moderator since it was not in writing. Mrs. 
Conley for the Finance Committee remarked that it was willing to recom- 
mend a modest amount - less than $1,000.00 - from the reserve fund 
for this purpose. Mr. Navarro said that if the Town voted favorably on 
the article, the Selectmen as Electric Light Commissioners have it within 
their power to allocate the funds necessary and this they would do. Motion 
carried on a voice vote. 

Article 15: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
to purchase land and building currently owned by William Rust on Line- 
brook Road for future use as a Fire Sub-Station, and to determine whether 
such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise or take any 
other action with respect thereto. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town vote to purchase land and build- 
ings owned by William Rust on Linebrook Road, land to include approxi- 
mately .5346 acres and a building of concrete block construction and 
5000 square feet, more or less. Said building is located on Linebrook Road 
approximately 200 feet westerly of the Newburyport Turnpike (Route 1) 
and that sum of $100,000.00 be appropriated therefor, said sum to be 
raised by the transfer of said $100,000.00 from the Revenue Sharing 
Account, and he further moved that the Town Manager be authorized to 
negotiate to secure necessary sewer, water and access easements over 
other property owned by said William Rust. Seconded. Mr. Cobb stated 
that a fire station is badly needed in that part of Town; this building will 
be equipped and manned by present personnel and equipment. Edward 
Nagus for the Finance Committee remarked that the price in relation to 
overall size and construction is reasonable, and the Committee recom- 
mended the purchase. Planning Board Chairman George Mathey said 
that his Board realized the necessity for such a building and had negoti- 
ated with the PCD Developers, but felt that a fire station in that develop- 
ment would be a long time coming. The Planning Board recommended 
the article 4-1 . The motion carried on a voice vote. 



22 



Article 16: To see what action the Town will take relative to approval 
of a contract with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority for 
train service provided to the Town during the period July 01, 1974, to 
June 30, 1975, and to appropriate a sum of money therefor, said appropri- 
ation to be made by transfer from available funds. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the Board of Selectmen authorize the 
Town Manager to enter into a constract or contracts with the Massachusetts 
Bay Transportation Authority pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 161 A, 
Sections 3(j) and 5(j), for the provision of train service to the Town during 
the period July 1, 1974, through June 30, 1975, substantially in accordance 
with the form of contract heretofore submitted to the Town by the MBTA, 
and that the sum of $30,000.00 be appropriated therefor, said appropria- 
tion to be made by transfer from free cash. Seconded. John Vincent gave 
the background of the MBTA, stating that we were better off financially 
by contracting for service than were the towns that had joined the MBTA. 
Lincoln Morrison stated that the Finance Committee recommended Articles 
16 and 16A unanimously. The Board of Selectmen unanimously supported 
the article. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 16A: To see what action the Town will take relative to approval 
of a contract with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority for 
provision of train service to the Town for the period July 01, 1975, to 
December 31, 1975, and to appropriate a sum of money therefor. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the Board of Selectmen authorize the 
Town Manager to enter into a contract or contracts with the Massachusetts 
Bay Transportation Authority pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 161 A, 
Sections 3(j) and 5(j) for the provision of train service to the Town for 
the period July 1, 1975, through December 31, 1975, substantially in 
accordance with the form of contract theretofore submitted to the Town 
by the MBTA and that the sum of $15,000.00 be raised and appropriated 
therefor. Seconded. Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 15: the Moderator stated that Mr. Dalton had brought to his 
attention the fact that Article 15 needed a two-thirds vote to pass, unless 
the voice vote was unanimous. The motion carried by a unanimous voice 
vote. 

Article 17: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of constructing an extension of the water system 
from Fowlers Lane along Town Farm Road to Greenspoint Road, and to 
determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise, or take any other action relative thereto. (Ten Taxpayers) 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $35,400.00 for the laying of water mains not less than 6" in di- 
ameter from Fowler's Lane along Town Farm Road to Green's Point 
Road. Seconded. George Tsoutouris for the Finance Committee recom- 
mended; the Board of Selectmen recommended. Motion carried on a voice 
vote. 



23 



Article 18: To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money for 
the purpose of constructing extensions of the Sanitary Sewer System on 
Dornell Road, Avery Road, Currier Park and Green Street, and to deter- 
mine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Navarro moved that the Town vote to extend the sanitary 
sewer system to include Dornell Road, Avery Street, Currier Park and 
Green Street, and that the sum of $235,000.00 be appropriated by the 
Town for this purpose and that to raise this sum $5,522.62 be transferred 
from Town Wharf Area Sewer Extension Project funds raised by bond 
issue of 1970, said project having been completed, and that the sum of 
$77.38 be transferred from the North Main Street Sewer Extension Pro- 
ject funds raised by bond issue of 1969, said project having been completed, 
and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be authorized 
to issue $229,400.00 bonds or notes of the Town under General Laws 
Chapter 44, section 7(1) as amended and that the Town authorize the 
Town Manager to secure easements necessary to carry out said projects 
by purchase. Seconded. Mr. Navarro said that many of the residents in 
the area of the first three streets have sewerage problems and the proximity 
to Brown's Well makes the situation hazardous. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended. The Finance Committee was 7-2 in favor. On a two-thirds 
vote, 943 voted in the affirmative, 53 voted in the negative. 

Article 19: To see if the Town will vote to accept Caroline Avenue as a 
Public Way or take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Damon moved that the Town establish as a Town Way, 
Caroline Avenue, by accepting the layout of the Board of Selectmen and 
as shown on plan filed with the Town Clerk identified as "Plan Showing 
Land of Ipswich Housing Authority for Housing for the Elderly Project, 
Ipswich 667-3, October 1970, Scale 1" = 40', Chester J. Patch Associates, 
Inc., Ipswich, Mass." as amended on March 2, 1975, by C. J. Patch, 
Ipswich, Mass. Seconded. This motion refers to Caroline Avenue between 
Broadway and Brownville Avenues; fifty yards at the top of the street are 
unpaved. The Town is asked to accept this so that it can be paved. The 
Finance Committee recommended. In answer to a question, Mr. Silvia 
said that the project would cost under $2,000.00 and could be done with 
Chapter 90 funds. Carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

Article 20: To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following by-law: 

A person who owns or keeps a dog within the territorial limits of the 
Town of Ipswich shall not permit nor allow such a dog to be at large in 
the Town, other than on the premises demised to its owner or keeper, 
unless said dog is restrained by being kept on a leash not exceeding six feet 
in length. Disposition of complaints or violations of this by-law will be 
in accordance with the General Laws, Chapter 140, Section 173-A. 

Chapter 140, Section 173-A 

Whenever a complaint is sought in a district court for a violation of an 
ordinance or by-law, made under the provisions of section one hundred 
and seventy-three, the clerk shall send a written notice to the person com- 



74 



plained against stating that such a complaint has been sought and will 
issue unless such person appears before such clerk and confesses the 
offense either personally or through an agent duly authorized in writing, 
or by mailing to such clerk, with the notice the fine provided herein. If 

it is the first offense subject to this section committed by such person 
within a calendar year, the clerk shall dismiss the charge without the pay- 
ment of fine, if it is the second offense so committed in such city or town 
in the calendar year the payment to the clerk of a fine of two dollars shall 
operate as a final disposition of the case; if it is the third offense so com- 
mitted in such city or town in a calendar year payment of a fine of five 
dollars shall operate as a final disposition of the case; and if it is the 
fourth or subsequent offense so committed in such city or town in the 
calendar year the payment of a fine of ten dollars shall operate as a final 
disposition of the case. Such payment shall be made only by postal note, 
money order or check. Notwithstanding the foregoing procedure and 
schedule of fines and subject, however, to all of the other provisions of 
this section, a city or town may by ordinance or by-law, provide for an 
alternative procedure and a different schedule of fines, provided, however, 
that no new schedule of fines shall contain a fine in excess of ten dollars. 

Proceedings under this section shall not be deemed criminal; and no 
person notified to appear before the clerk of a district court as provided 
herein shall be required to report to any probation officer, and no record 
of the case shall be entered in the probation records. 

If a person notified to appear, as hereinbefore provided, fails to appear 
or pay the fine within twenty-one days of the sending of the notice, or 
having appeared, does not desire to avail himself of the procedure established 
by this section, the clerk shall issue the complaints and the procedure 
established for criminal cases shall be followed. 

If any person fails to appear in accordance with the summons issued 
upon such complaint, the clerk of the court shall send such person, by 
registered mail, return receipt requested, a notice that the complaint 
is pending and that, if the person fails to appear within twenty-one days 
from the sending of such notice, a warrant for his arrest will be issued. 
(1967, 627; 1971, 526, approved July 15, 1971, effective 90 days there- 
after.) Ten Taxpayers. 

Mrs. Joan Logan moved to see if the Town will vote to adopt 
the following by-law: A person who owns or keeps a dog within the ter- 
ritorial limits of the Town of Ipswich shall not permit nor allow such a 
dog to be at large in the Town, other than on the premises of its owner or 
keeper or premises demised to its owner or keeper, unless said dog is 
restrained by being kept on a leash not exceeding six feet in length. Dis- 
position of complaints of violations of this by-law will be in accordance 
with the General Laws, Chapter 140, section 173-A. Seconded. Mrs. Logan 
said there is a very bad problem regarding dogs; this program will be costly 
but something must be done to protect children, elderly citizens, property. 
Edward Nagus for the Finance Committee informed that it recommended 
7-2 against, feeling that the proposed by-law should be more fully investi- 
gated as to cost and enforcement. Mr. Cobb for the Board of Selectmen 
said it was 4-1 against the motion. John Macken, a professional dog 



25 



trainer, asked that voters use sense of common responsibility and civic 
pride, and vote in favor. Claire Farrell, James Douglas spoke in favor of 
the article; both had had unpleasant experiences. Robert Jackson men- 
tioned that other towns have laws requiring that dogs be restrained during 
and after bussing hours to keep them away from schoolyards. The motion 
carried with 705 voting in the affirmative, 400 in the negative. 

Article 21; To see if the Town will vote to place the following proposed 
Town By-Law on the ballot for consideration of the voters at the next 
town election: 

A person who owns or keeps a dog within the territorial limits of the 
Town of Ipswich shall permit nor allow such a dog to be at large in the 
Town, other than on the premises of its owner or keeper or premises 
demised to its owner or keeper, unless said dog is restrained by being kept 
on a leash not exceeding six feet in length. Disposition of complaints or 
violations of this by-law will be in accordance with the General Laws, 
Chapter 140, Section 173-A. (See Article 20 under Chapter 140, Section 
173-A.) Ten Taxpayers 

This article was ruled out of order by the Moderator. 

Article 22: To see what action the Town will take to appropriate a sum 
of money to purchase for conservation purposes a certain parcel of land 
in the Bull Brook Watershed of approximately 75 acres believed to be 
owned by Vincent M. Marini and to see what method the Town will adopt 
to raise and appropriate such sum by borrowing or otherwise or to take 
any action with respect thereto. 

Frederic Winthrop, Jr., moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate $84,000.00, and transfer said sum to the Conservation Fund, 
for the purchase by the Conservation Commission in the name of the 
Town under Chapter 40, Section 8.C. for conservation purposes a certain 
parcel of land believed to be owned by Vincent M. Marini and Gina Marini 
on the northerly side of Linebrook Road in Ipswich, Massachusetts, 
containing 77.56 acres, more or less, and shown as Lot 1 on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Land Located in Ipswich, Mass., Surveyed for Ipswich Conserva- 
tion Commission" dated January 22, 1975, by Gallagher Engineering Inc. 
and being bounded and described according to said plan which is in- 
corporated in this motion by reference: BEGINNING at a point on the 
northerly sideline of Linebrook Road at a stone wall between the herein 
described parcel and land of Atwood (Land Court Case #2944); thence 
running along said stone wall North 11 °33'10" East by said Atwood land, 
235.67 feet to land of Dooley; thence running North 56°53'16" East by 
said Dooley land, 52.05 feet; thence running North 58°50'49" East by 
land of Bruton and Beckwith,, 199.18 feet; thence running North 61 °26'12" 
East by land of Tucker, Foster and Banell, 234.19 feet; thence running North 
69°58'02" East by said Banell land and land now or formerly of Campanelli, 
203.90 feet; thence running North 71°47'51" East by said Campanelli 
land, 99.66 feet; thence running North 73°05'12" East by said Campanelli 
land, 478.71 feet to another stone wall, all of the last six courses being 



26 



along a stone wall; thence turning and running North 29°5r22" West by 
said Campanelli land, 107.84 feet; thence running North 34°03'51" West 
by said Campanelli land, 200.99 feet; thence running North 35°35'12" 
West by said Campanelli land, 114.76 feet; thence running North 32°25' 
15" West by said Campanelli land, 202.21 feet; thence running North 
34°00'0r' West by said Campanelli land and by land of Duffy and again 
by said Campanelli land, 352.16 feet; thence running North 31°59 , 2r > 
West by said Campanelli land 159.23 feet to a corner in a stone wall, 
all of the last six courses being along a stone wall; thence turning and 
running North 56°33'24" East by said Campanelli land, 82.61 feet; thence 
running North 65 37'35" East by said Campanelli land, 133.68 feet to a 
corner in a stone wall, the last two courses being along a stone wall; thence 
turning and running North 23°27 , 52" West by said Campanelli land along 
a stone wall, 242.87 feet to a corner in a stone wall at land of Ipswich 
Fairways (Land Court Case #27242); thence turning and running North 
76°53'08" East, by said land of Ipswich Fairways, 568.59 feet; thence run- 
ning North 78°03'49" East by land of Ipswich Fairways, 145.49 feet; thence 
running North 75°28'06" East by said Ipswich Fairways land, 125.50 feet; 
thence running North 77°40'54" East by said Ipswich Fairways land, 157.25 
feet to another stone wall, all of the last four courses being along a stone wall; 
thence turning and running South 36 17'16 ,, East by land of Ipswich 
Fairways (Land Court Case #33649), 442.77 feet; thence running South 
37°43'44" East by said Ipswich Fairways Lane, 331.64 feet; thence running 
South 36°38'37" East by said Ipswich Fairways land, 235. 83 feet; thence 
running South 37 o 51'02" East by said Ipswich Fairways land, 421.25 feet 
to land of Antonio Galicki; thence running South 35°59'32" East by 
said Galicki land, 409.98 feet; thence running South 38°34'47" East by 
said Galicki land, 101.70 feet to another stone wall, all of the last six 
courses being along a stone wall; thence turning and running Sourth 71 °41' 
36" West by remaining land of the Grantors, 194.86 feet; thence running 
South 72°39 , 13" West by said land of the Grantors, 150.62 feet; thence 
running South 73 °14'58" West by said land of the Grantors, 400.96 feet; 
thence running South 68°52'38" West by said land of the Grantors, 53.24 
feet; thence running South 72°32'38" West by said land of the Grantors, 
239.42 feet; thence running South 71°57'4r' West by said land of the 
Grantors, 444.83 feet to an iron pipe; thence running South 71 °57'41" West 
by said land of the Grantors, 550 feet to a corner, the last seven courses being 
in part along the remains of a stone wall; thence turning and running 
South 07°30'09" West by said land of the Grantors, 398.96 feet to the 
northerly sideline of the Linebrook Road; thence turning and running 
along the northerly sideline of Linebrook Road on a curve with a radius 
of 1720 feet, 339.41 feet; thence running North 63°03'16" West, by said 
northerly sideline of said Linebrook Road on a curved line having a radius 
of 1760 feet, 174.60 feet; thence running North 68 44'18 , ' West along 
the northerly sideline of Linebrook Road, 205.81 feet; thertce running 
along the northerly sideline of Linebrook Road, 25.74 feet to the point of 
the beginning. Seconded. Mr. Winthrop stated that protection of our 
watershed is vital and this land will create a buffer zone between Pinefield 
and PCD and the Town, and will establish a greenbelt from the State 
Forest to High Street. It is important to conserve farmland and part of 
this land will be leased back to Mr. Marini to farm. The price of $84,000.00 



27 



is the average between two appraisals and is 50% reimbursable from the 
State. The Board of Selectmen recommended. Dr. Waite for the Finance 
Committee stated that it supported the article unanimously. Mr. Mathey 
for the Planning Board stated that it was 4-0 with one abstention in favor. 
The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 23: To see if the Town will vote to adopt a Resolution indicating 
the intent to preserve the land formerly leased to the Air Force and adjacent 
Dump area on Town Farm Road for recreational purposes or to take any 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved the following resolution: Whereas, the land 
owned by the Town and formerly leased to the United States Air Force 
on Town Farm Road has now been returned in its entirety to the Town 
and; Whereas, this parcel of some 350 acres includes nature's beautiful 
marshes and serene surroundings and; Whereas, this area has not been 
measurably altered from its natural and virgin state and; Whereas, this 
property should be used for the benefit of all our citizens and; Whereas, 
this land is ideally suited for recreational purposes and; Whereas, it is 
understood that other current uses by the Town at the disposal area and 
activities associated with the building erected at that site are to be con- 
tinued as long as required. Therefore, we the voters of Ipswich on this third 
day of March 1975 do hereby resolve that this land be used for recreational 
purposes and by a positive vote so declare that intent. Seconded. Mr. Silvia 
explained that about three months ago Mrs. A.W. Smith appeared before 
Board' of Selectmen and asked for a Resolve. Mrs. Smith from the audi- 
ence said that she had looked forward to two things for the past forty 
years: the pond in back of the Whipple House and the Town Farm land, 
and she was so happy that both had come to pass. The Board of Select- 
men unanimously recommended. The Finance Committee recommended 
5-4. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 24: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
to construct an Elementary School at an appropriate location in the Town 
to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise or to take any other action with respect thereto. 

'School Building Needs Committee member Alfred Kotek moved 
that the Town appropriate the sum of $2,400,000.00 to design, engineer, 
construct and originally equip and furnish an elementary school and to 
raise this appropriation the Town authorize the Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, to issue $2,400,000.00 bonds or notes of the 
Town under Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948 as amended, and that the 
School Building Needs Committee be authorized to carry out said project 
and to contract for and expend State and Federal construction grants 
for the project, provided that no borrowing shall be incurred pursuant 
to this vote unless the Selectmen determine that State aid in the form of a 
total construction grant of at least 65 per cent of the final approved con- 
struction cost of the school project is available therefor. 

And further moved that the Town-owned land located on Mile Lane, 
previously purchased by the Town for the construction of a new high 



28 



school be utilized for this project. 

And futher moved that, pursuant to Chapter II, Section 6 of the Town 
By-laws, this motion be voted on by printed ballot on March 10th at the 
portion of this meeting devoted to the election of officers and the deter- 
mination of such questions as by law or the By-laws are required to be 
determined by ballot. 

Seconded. William Craft explained why it is necessary to have a new 
school. Mr. Kozeneski said that the Selectmen were 3-2 in favor of the 
motion. Thomas Emery said that the Finance Committee were unanimously 
in favor. School Committee supported article. Fred Paulitz concurred in 
the need for a school but questioned the site. He felt Topsfield Road 
would be a better one; that the sewerage cost on Mile Lane would be 
more than projected. William Wasserman asked that Mr. Craft reply to 
Mr. Paulitz and Mr. Craft stated that the projected cost of site develop- 
ment would be $125,000.00 with $55,000.00 for on-site sewerage, the 
remainder for access roads, fill, etc. He said that there is no reason to 
believe that there will be any problem due to the proximity to the water- 
shed - tests have been taken by the State. Joseph Hoffman asked what 
plans there were for the Burley and Shatswell Schools? What impact would 
there be on school staff? And if approximately the same number of stu- 
dents would be accommodated in the new school as are at Doyon (540) 
why do we need a larger school? 

It was explained that the Shatswell could be used for Chapter 766 of- 
fices and in conjunction with the Jr. High; the Burley could be used for 
storage space or sold or torn down. No additional teachers are anticipated. 
There will be slightly more pupils than at Doyon and also more spaces 
are now required, thus the larger plan. The motion was carried on a voice 
vote. 

Article 25: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to bus Ipswich Children to out of Town private schools, and to 
see whether the Town will arrange for such transportation. Ten Taxpayers. 

Frederick Rockett moved that the Town of Ipswich raise and 
appropriate the sum of $21,260.00 for the purpose of transporting stu- 
dents to out-of-town private schools having an enrollment of twenty or 
more students from the Town of Ipswich, and to request the School Com- 
mittee to implement its previous policy of transporting students to such 
out-of-town private schools. Seconded. Mr. Rockett said that a favorable 
vote would continue the policy to bus children out of town to private 
schools; the three-year contract should be honored; the safety and well- 
being of Ipswich children is better in bus transportation; private schools 
are presently subsidized through school lunch programs, etc. The Board 
of Selectmen supported the article. George Tsoutouris stated that the 
Finance Committee was 6-3 in favor. Mr. Gahm, stating that this was a 
very emotional issue, explained that the School Committee had rescinded 
their policy on a 5-2 vote. Mrs. Patricia Manning, Mrs. Dorothy Walton, 
Steven Johnson spoke in favor of the article, John Logan against. The 
question was moved, and the motion was defeated with 318 voting in the 
affirmative, 471 voting in the negative. 



29 



Mr. Navarro moved that the meeting adjourn to next Monday, 
March 10, 1975, the next session of this meeting which is devoted to bal- 
loting for Town officers and such questions as are legally placed thereon, 
at the conclusion of which this meeting shall be dissolved. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. The meeting stood adjourned at 1 1 :40 p.m. 



Attest: Harold G. Comeau, Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

Ipswich High School June 9, 1975 



Essex ss. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County. 
GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby 
directed to notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to 
vote in Town affairs, to meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said 
Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE NINTH DAY OF JUNE, 1975 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following 
articles, viz: 

The meeting was called to order by Moderator Harold Shively at 7:35 
p.m. with a quorum of 325 present. The final count was 471 . Mr. Shively 
led the voters present in the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. 

Town Clerk Harold G. Comeau read the opening and closing para- 
graphs of the Warrant and the Constable's Return. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were: Rainier Broekel, William 
Craft, Roger Drumm, Sheila Beyer, William J. Murphy. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Charles K. Cobb, Jr., moved 
that visitors and students be allowed to enter and take seats at the front 
of the hall. Seconded. Motion carried unanimously. 

Article 1: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to the Equipment Maintenance Operating Supplies Account, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Town Manager Leonard J. Silvia moved that the Town vote to 
appropriate the sum of $8,500.00 from available funds as follows: A 
transfer of $2,500.00 from Surplus Revenue (Free Cash), a transfer of 



30 



$5,000.00 from the Miles River Improvement Account, and a transfer 
of $1,000.00 from the Planning Board, line item 1 14-2-92, to be transferred 
to the Equipment Maintenance Operating Supplies Account. Seconded. 
Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 2: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to the School Department Operating and Maintenance of Plant 
Account, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Chairman of the School Committee Paul Gahm moved that the 
Town vote to appropriate from Surplus Revenue (Free Cash) the sum of 
$7,000.00, said sum to be transferred to the School Department Operating 
and Maintenance of Plant Account. Seconded. Finance Committee recom- 
mended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 3: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to fund the Police Educational Incentive Program, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$6,200.00 from Surplus Revenue (Free Cash) to be transferred to the 
Police Department Incentive Program Account to fund the Police Educa- 
tional Incentive Program for the period January 1, 1975, to June 30, 
1975. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

Article 4: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for Town Hall Repairs, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$8,500.00 to be transferred from the Planning Board account, line item 
1 14-2-92 to the Town Hall Repairs account. Seconded. Finance Commit- 
tee recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 5: To see what action the Town will take on a report by the 
Selectmen's Bicentennial Committee and on the subject of the American 
Revolutionary Bicentennial. 

The report of the Bicentennial Committee was read by Jean 
Bucklin. No action was required. 

Article 6: To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the Chapter 766 assessment at the Whittier Regional Voca- 
tional Technical High School, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Edward Penny, Ipswich representative on the Whittier School 
Committee, moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $2,919.21 
to be transferred from the Selectmen's Bicentennial Committee Special 
Items (class 6) account to pay the Chapter 766 assessment at the Whittier 
Regional Vocational Technical High School. Seconded. Board of Selectmen 



31 



and Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on unanimous 
voice vote. 

Article 7: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to the Dog Officer Salary Account, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard jnoved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$5,800.00 from Surplus Revenue (Free Cash) to be transferred to the Dog 
Officer S^ary Account. Seconded. Dr. Waite announced that the Finance 
Committee was 5-4 in favor. Motion carried on a voice vote. On a request 
from the floor for a hand count, the vote was 250 voting in the affirma- 
tive, 106 in the negative. Motion carried. 

Article 8: To see what action the Town will take relative to establishing 
a Council on Aging, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town vote to amend Chapter 11 
of the By-laws of Ipswich 1973 by adding Section 12 as follows: 
Section 12. Council on Aging. 

(a) The Selectmen shall appoint a Council on Aging for the purpose of 
coordinating or carrying out programs designed to meet the problems of 
the aging in cooperation with programs of the Department of Elderly 
Affairs. 

(b) The Selectmen shall appoint a Council on Aging consisting of seven 
(7) members, comprising three (3) members for three (3) years, two (2) 
members for two (2) years, and two (2) members for one (1) year terms. 
Members may be reappointed for concurrent terms. The members of the 
Council shall serve without pay. 

(c) Whenever a vacancy shall occur in the membership of the Council, 
by reason of death, resignation, inability to act or for any other reason, 
the vacancy shall be filled by appointment by the Selectmen for the re- 
mainder of the term. 

(d) The Council on Aging at its first annual meeting, and thereafter 
annually, in June of each year, shall elect from the membership a President, 
Secretary and Treasurer. Each officer shall hold office until the next 
annual election. In the event a vacancy occurs in any of the offices above, 
the Council shall hold a special meeting for the purpose of electing one 
of its members to fill such vacancy. 

(e) The Council shall prepare and submit an annual report of its activi- 
ties to the Town and to the Department of Elderly Affairs. Seconded. 
Finance Committee recommended 8-1 in favor. Motion carried on voice 
vote. 

Article 9: To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from 
the Shellfish Departmental Supplies and Service Account to the Shellfish 
Salary Account, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of 
$5,000.00 from the Shellfish Expense Account to the Shellfish Salary 
Account for use in predator control. Seconded. Finance Committee recom- 
mended. Motion carried. 



32 



Article 10: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to extend the Sanitary Sewer to Winter Street, a distance of 
500 feet more or less, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum 
of $6,000.00 for extension of the Sanitary Sewer to Winter Street, a distance 
of 500' more or less; that to.meet this appropriation said sum be trans- 
ferred from Sewer Receipts. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. 
Motion carried. 

Article 11: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to acquire by eminent domain, purchase or otherwise for the purpose 
of constructing thereon a reservoir, pumping station, and water treat- 
ment facility, the following parcels of land, together with necessary rights 
of way and water rights: Beginning at a point 270 feet, more or less, from 
the easterly corner of land of Rice, running on several courses southeasterly 
and northeasterly 1420 feet, more or less, by land of said Rice, thence on 
several courses northeasterly, southeasterly, southerly 2570 feet, more or 
less, by land of the Estate of Tougas; thence on one course in a south- 
easterly direction 1 100 feet, more or less, by the land of Pappalimberis to 
land now or formerly of Saroka; thence by land now formerly of Saroka, 
Sheppard and Ciolek; thence southeasterly to Topsfield Road; thence 
along Topsfield Road to property of Hall; thence northwesterly along 
property of Hall to property of Pappalimberis; thence northeasterly 
along property now or formerly of Hall and Arthur; thence northwesterly 
by land of Pappalimberis 1300 feet, more or less; thence on two courses 
775 feet, more or less, on land now of H & H Realty; thence northwesterly 
570 feet, more or less, on land of Pappalimberis to land of Markos; thence 
northeasterly 200 feet, more or less, into land of Markos; thence north- 
easterly 125 feet, more or less to land of Pappalimberis; thence 300 feet, 
more or less by land of Pappalimberis to Pineswamp Road; thence north- 
westerly 55 feet across Pineswamp Road; thence northwesterly 640 feet, 
more or less, by land of Ladd; thence 1220 feet, more or less, on land 
now or formerly of Chapman to land of Wegzyn, thence along several 
courses southwesterly, a distance of 1300 feet, more or less, on land of 
Wegzyn to land of Kamon; thence southwesterly 590 feet, more or less by 
land of Kamon; thence southerly 40 feet more or less across Pineswamp 
Road; thence southerly 270 feet more or less, by Pineswamp Road and 
land of Rice; aforesaid, to the point of beginning. Meaning to describe 
herein lands of Rice, Estate of Tougas, Wegzyn, Chapman, H & H Realty, 
Pappalimberis, and Kamon as shown on a plan by Essex Survey Service 
and on file with the Town Clerk; making use of available State and Federal 
Aid, and to appropriate a sum of money therefor, and to determine whether 
such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, purchase or otherwise for the 
purpose of constructing thereon a reservoir, pumping station, and water 
treatment facility, the following parcels of land, together with the neces- 
sary rights of way and water rights: Beginning at a point 270' more or 
less from the easterly corner of land of Rice, running on several courses 



33 



southeasterly and northeasterly 1420' more or less by land of said Rice; 
thence on several courses northeasterly, southeasterly, southerly 2570' 
more or less by land of the Estate of Tougas; thence on one course in a 
southeasterly direction 1100' more or less by the land of Pappalimberis 
to land now or formerly of Saroka; thence by land now or formerly of 
Saroka, Sheppard and Ciolek; thence southeasterly to Topsfield Road; 
thence along Topsfield Road to property of Hall; thence northwesterly 
along property of Hall to property of Pappalimberis; thence northeasterly 
along property now or formerly of Hall and Arthur; thence northwesterly 
by land of Pappalimberis 1300' more or less; thence on two courses 775' 
more or less on land now of H & H Realty; thence northwesterly 570' 
more or less on land of Pappalimberis to land of Markos; thence north- 
easterly 200' more or less into land of Markos; thence northeasterly 125' 
more or less to land of Pappalimberis; thence 300' more or less by land 
of Pappalimberis to Pineswamp Road; thence northwesterly 55' across 
Pineswamp Road; thence northwesterly 640' more or less by land of Ladd; 
thence 1220' more or less on land now or formerly of Chapman to land 
of Wegzyn thence along several courses southwesterly a distance of 1300' 
more or less on land of Wegzyn to land of Kamon; thence southwesterly 
590' more or less by land of Kamon; thence southerly 40' more or less 
across Pineswamp Road; thence southerly 270' more or less by Pine- 
swamp Road and land of Rice; aforesaid, to the point of the beginning. 
Meaning to describe herein lands of Rice, Estate of Tougas, Wegzyn, 
Chapman, H & H Realty, Pappalimberis, and Kamon as show on a plan 
by Essex Survey Service and on file with the Town Clerk. And that the 
sum of $584,000.00 be appropriated therefore; and that to raise this ap- 
propriation the Treasurer of the Town of Ipswich with approval of the 
Selectmen is authorized to borrow $584,000.00 under General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 8. The Town Manager, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, is authorized to contract for any Federal or State aid for this 
project, provided that the total authorized borrowing shall be reduced 
by the amount of said aid. Seconded. 

Mr. Cobb gave the background of the 1967 Camp, Dresser & McKee 
recommendation of this plan, which has been defeated at the 1969, 1970 
and 1972 Town Meetings. He stated that we still need water, the price of 
land is constantly rising, and mentioned as alternatives: 1) Use of existing 
supplies (except Ipswich River); raising the dam at the spillway and filling 
the exfsting basin to supply an additional 200,000 gallons daily. Bull 
Brook would need extensive treatment due to its high iron content. This 
alternative would cost approximately $3,500,000.00. 2) Use of the Ipswich 
River; run water through treatment plant and put directly into the system, 
pump from the river into Dow's, or transfer into the Corsey Brook water- 
shed. This would not be too practical for various reasons, among them 
the cost, about $10,000,000.00. 3) Two regional proposals: 30A with a 
capacity of 2Vi million gallons and a surface of one square mile, would 
service eight communities in Essex County and would be on State land. 
The State is recommending 30B which is approximately the same size 
in area but would hold 20 million gallons and would serve 20 communities. 
Mr. Cobb felt that this plan was feasible but grandiose; the Town must 
approve it before the State could acquire any land; it would cost around 
$70,000,000.00 and so far, there has been no indication of what Ipswich's 



34 



share of the cost would be. 

At this point, Mr. Cobb moved for indefinite postponement of the 
article - Seconded - and asked for a sense of the meeting on 1) use of 
spring runoff; 2) reliance on Town's own supply or a regional one - 30A 
or 30B; 3) water from the Ipswich River; 4) Kimball Brook? 

Edwin Damon, Carl Russo, Lillian Bartnicki, Thomas Perkins, Terrance 
Perkins, David Greeley spoke against indefinite postponement. Mrs. 
Conley stated that the Finance Committee supported indefinite post- 
ponement, feeling the problem needed more thought given to a solution. 
The motion to indefinitely postpone Article 1 1 was defeated on a voice 
vote. 

Fred Paulitz spoke against Article 1 1 . Mr. Dalton stated that the Finance 
Committee was 5-3 in favor of it. A two-thirds vote was necessary. On 
the vote, the motion was defeated with 128 voting in the affirmative, 301 
in the negative. 

Article 12: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to study Sewerage and Sewage Disposal in the Great Neck, 
Little Neck and Jeffrey's Neck Road areas and to see what method the 
Town will adopt to raise and appropriate such sum by borrowing pr other- 
wise or to take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pimentel moved that the Town vote to appropriate the 
sum of $55,000.00 to study sewerage and sewage disposal in the Great 
Neck, Little Neck and Jeffrey's Neck Road areas; that to raise this ap- 
propriation, said sum to be transferred from Sewer Receipts Reserve. 
Seconded. Finance Committee voted 6-2-1 against this article. George 
Mathey reported the Planning Board in favor. It hopes to bring in an 
updated Zoning By-law at the next Annual Town Meeting, increasing the 
land areas in the Necks. Frederic Winthrop, Jr., stated that the Conserva- 
tion Commission had not taken a vote on the article, but he was personally 
opposed to it. Cornelius Cleary spoke in favor, also Fred Paulitz. Mr. 
Dalton moved the question, and the motion was defeated on a voice 
vote. 

Mr. Silvia moved that Article 15 be taken out of order. Seconded. 
Motion carried. 

Article 15: To see if the town will vote to amend Chapter II of the By- 
Laws of the Town of Ipswich by repealing Section 1 (a) thereof and adopt- 
ing one of the following: 

Section 1 Annual Town Meeting (a) The Annual Town Meeting of the 
Town of shall be held at 7:30 p.m. on the first Monday in May: and all 
. business, except the election of such officers and the determination of 
such matters as by law or by this chapter are required to be elected or 
determined by ballot, shall be considered at that meeting or at an adjourn- 
ment thereof to another day. That part of the Annual Town Meeting 
devoted to the election of officers and the determination of such questions 
as by law or by this chapter are required to be elected or determined by 
ballot shall be held on the second Monday in May in accordance with 
the provision of Section 6. The hours during which the polls shall be 



35 



kept open for such balloting may be designated at the meeting, subject 
to the provisions of Section 64 or Chapter 54 of the General Laws. 

Section 1 Annual Town Meeting (A) The Annual Town Meeting of the 
Town shall be held at 9:00 a.m. on the first Saturday in May: and all 
business, except the election of such officers and the determination of 
such matters as by law or by this chapter are required to be elected or 
determined by ballot, shall be considered at that meeting or at an adjourn- 
ment thereof to another day. That part of the Annual Town Meeting de- 
voted to the election of officers and the determination of such questions 
as by law or by this chapter are required to be elected or determined by 
ballot shall be held on the second Saturday in May in accordance with 
the provisions of Section 6. The hours during which the polls shall be kept 
open for such balloting may be designated at the meeting, subject to the 
provisions of Section 64 of Chapter 54 of the General Laws. 

Mr. Damon moved the Town vote to amend Chapter II of the 
By-laws of the Town of Ipswich by repealing Section 1(a) thereof and 
adopting the following: 

SECTION I. ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, (a) The Annual Town 
Meeting of the Town shall be held at 7:30 p.m. on the first Monday in 
May: and all business, except the election of such officers and the determina- 
tion of such matters as by law or by this chapter are required to be elected 
or determined by ballot, shall be considered at that meeting or at an adjourn- 
ment thereof to another day. That part of the Annual Town meeting de- 
voted to the election of officers and the determination of such questions 
as by law or by this chapter are required to be elected or determined by 
ballot shall be held on the second Monday in May in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 6. The hours during which the polls shall be kept 
open for such balloting may be designated at the meeting, subject to the 
provisions of Section 64 of Chapter 54 of the General Laws. Seconded. 
Mr. Damon stated that the Selectmen had chosen the first Monday in 
May rather than the first Saturday unanimously. The Finance Committee 
recommended 5-4 in favor. Irving Small reported that the Government 
Study Committee held a public hearing on May 29th and voted unani- 
mously in favor of the article. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 16: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to purchase for recreation and conservation purposes certain 
parcels of land located westerly on Linebrook Road near the Topsfield 
town line and bordering a body of water known as Hood's Pond, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Mrs. Robertson moved indefinite postponement. Seconded. The 
Finance Committee was in favor of indefinite postponement. The motion 
carried on a voice vote. 

Article 17: To see if the Town will vote to purchase a certain parcel 
of land of approximately 10,000 square feet on Avery Street easterly 
approximately 200 yards from High Street currently owned by Poirier 
for conservation and recreation purposes, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 



36 



Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum 
of one dollar ($1.00) from available funds (Free Cash) to purchase for 
Recreation and Conservation purposes a parcel of land of 10,000 square 
feet on Avery Street easterly approximately 200 yards from High Street 
and currently owned by Poirier. Seconded. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended. On a hand count, the motion carried with 273 voting in the 
affirmative, 8 in the negative. 

Article 13: To see if the Town will vote adopt the following resolu- 
tion pertaining to Flood Insurance: 
RESOLVED: 

WHEREAS, certain areas of Ipswich are subject to periodic flooding 
from streams, rivers, lakes and oceans, causing serious damages to prop- 
erties within these areas; and 

WHEREAS, relief is available in the form of Federally subsidized flood 
insurance as authorized by the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968; 
and 

WHEREAS, it is the intent of this Board of Selectmen to require the 
recognition and evaluation of flood and-or mudslide hazards in all offi- 
cial actions relating to land use in the flood plain areas having special 
flood hazards; and 

WHEREAS, this body has the legal authority to adopt land use and 
control measures to reduce future flood losses pursuant to General Laws, 
Chapter 131, section 40, 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that this Board of Selectmen: 

1. Assures the Federal Insurance Administration that it will enact as 
necessary, and maintain in force for those areas having flood or mudslide 
hazards, adequate land use and control measures with effective enforce- 
ment provisions consistent with the Criteria set forth in Section 1910 of 
the National Flood Insurance Program Regulations; and 

2. Vests the Conservation Commission with the responsibility, authority, 
and means to: 

(a) Delineate or assist the Administrator, at his request, in delineating 
the limits of the areas having special flood hazards on available local 
maps of sufficient scale to identify the location of building sites. 

(b) Provide such information as the Administration may request 
concerning present uses and occupancy of the flood plain. 

(c) Cooperate with Federal, State and local agencies and private 
firms which undertake to study, survey, map and identify flood plain or 
mudslide areas, and cooperate with neighboring communities with respect 
to management of adjoining flood plain areas in order to prevent ag- 
gravation of existing hazards. 

(d) Submit on the anniversary date of the community's initial eligibility 
an annual report to the Administrator on the progress made during the 
past year within the community in the development and implementation 
of flood plain management measures. 

3. Appoints Inspector of Buildings to maintain for public inspection 
and to furnish upon request a record of elevations (in relation to mean 
sea level) of the lowest floor (including basement) of all new or substan- 
tially improved structures located in the special flood hazard areas. If 
the lowest floor is below grade on one or more sides, the elevation of the 



37 



floor immediately above must also be recorded. 

4. Agrees to take such other official action as may be reasonably neces- 
sary to carry out the objectives of the program. 

Mr. Cobb moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion 
carried on unanimous voice vote. 

Article 14: To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following resolu- 
tion pertaining to Flood Insurance: 
RESOLVED: 

WHEREAS, the Town of Ipswich has adopted and is enforcing the 
State of Massachusetts Building Code, and 

WHEREAS, Section 100.0 (Chapter 802, Acts of 1972) of the aforesaid 
prohibits any person, firm or corporation from erecting, constructing, 
enlarging, altering, repairing, improving, moving or demolishing any 
building or structure without first obtaining a separate building permit 
for each building or structure from the Inspector of Buildings. 

WHEREAS, the Inspector of Buildings must examine all plans and 
specifications for the proposed construction when application is made to 
him for a building permit. 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Selectmen 
of Ipswich as follows: 

1 . That the Inspector of Buildings shall review all building permit ap- 
plications for new construction or substantial improvements to determine 
whether proposed building sites will be reasonably safe from flooding. 
If a proposed building site is in a location that has a flood hazard, any 
proposed new construction or substantial improvement (including, pre- 
fabricated and mobile home) must (i.) be designed (or modified) and 
anchored to prevent flotation, collapse, or lateral movement of the struc- 
ture (ii.) use construction materials and utility equipment that are re- 
sistant to flood damage, and (iii.) use construction methods and practices 
that will minimize flood damage; and 

2. That the Planning Board shall review subdivision proposals and 
other proposed new developments to assure that (i) all such proposals 
are consistent with the need to minimize flood damage, (ii) all public 
utilities and facilities, such as sewer, gas, electrical, and water systems 
are located, elevated, and constructed to minimize or eliminate flood 
damage, and (iii) adequate drainage is provided so as to reduce exposure 
to flood hazards; and 

3. That the Department of Public Works shall require new or replace- 
ment water supply systems and-or sanitary sewage systems to be designed 
to minimize or eliminate infiltration of flood waters, and require on-site 
waste disposal systems to be located so as to avoid impairment of them 
or contamination from them during flooding. 

Mr. Cobb moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Mo- 
tion carried on unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the meeting stand adjourned. Seconded. Unani- 
mous voice vote. The meeting stood adjourned at 9:42 p.m. 

Attest: A true copy 

Harold G. Comeau, Town Clerk 

38 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

Ipswich High School November 17, 1975 



Essex, ss. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County. 
GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby 
directed to notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to 
vote in Town affairs, to meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said 
Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE SEVENTEENTH DAY OF NOVEMBER 1975 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and thereto act on the following 
articles, viz: 

The meeting was called to order at 7:30 p.m by Moderator Harold 
Shively with a quorum of 366 present. The final count was 755. The Rev. 
Robert F. Dobson offered a prayer, and the Moderator led the Pledge of 
Allegiance to the Flag. 

Town Clerk Harold G. Comeau read the opening and closing para- 
graphs of the Warrant and the Constable's Return. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were: John Conley, Carol Russo, 
Rainier Broekel, John Griffin, John Krajeski, William Craft, John Marden, 
Philip Stewart. 

The Moderator moved that visitors be allowed to enter the hall and sit 
at the front, facing the voters. Seconded. Motion carried unanimously. 

Article 1: To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money for the 
cost of engineering services for plans and specifications for the construc- 
tion of sewers, sewerage systems and sewage treatment and disposal facili- 
ties: To determine whether such appropriations shall be raised by bor- 
rowing, transfer from available funds or otherwise; or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Town Manager Leonard J. Silvia moved that the Town adopt 
the following vote: Voted: That $192,500. is appropriated for the cost of 
engineering services for plans and specifications for the construction of 
sewers, sewerage systems and sewage treatment and disposal facilities, 
and that to meet this appropriation $108,000. is transferred from the 
sewer receipts account and the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, is authorized to issue bonds in the amount of $84,500. 
under Chapter 44, Section 7(22) of the General Laws as amended, and 
that the Town Manager, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
is authorized to contract for and expend State and Federal Grants for 
said services. Seconded. 

Mr. Silvia gave a brief background of the motion and stated that the 



39 



studies would be for three priorities: 1) Muddy Brook pumping station 
forced main/High Street sewer/cross country interceptor to Linebrook 
Road; 2) extension of County Road sewer to proposed pumping station/ 
cross country sewer from Southern Heights to Masconomet Road; 3) 
Topsfield Road from Oakhurst Avenue to Cedarview Road. Mr. Silvia 
stated that there is $2,000,000. available in State aid for fiscal 1976 but if 
Ipswich does not use the money in that time period, it will go to another 
community. The Board of Selectmen recommended. The Finance Com- 
mittee recommended eight to one (Thomas Emery opposed). 

Chairman Albert Ebinger of the Cable Hospital Board of Trustees 
stated that the hospital has a very serious problem with sewerage seeping 
up out of the ground; temporary repairs were affected during the summer 
but the State has told the Trustees that a permanent solution, preferably 
into the Town system, must be found soon. Robert Bamford, Sally Wea- 
therall, Cornelius and Hazel Cleary spoke against the motion. Conservation 
Commission Chairman David Crestin gave the advantages and disadvantages 
as he saw them. On the vote the motion was defeated, 219 voting in the 
affirmative, 414 in the negative. 

Article 2: To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
to study alternative solutions to the sewer outfall situation at the Secondary 
Treatment Plant: To determine whether such appropriation shall be 
raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds or otherwise; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$19,500. from Available Funds in the Treasury (free cash) to study alterna- 
tive solutions to the sewer outfall situation at the Secondary Treatment 
Plant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. 
The motion was defeated 274 voting for 351 against. 

Article 3: To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
for treatment of Winthrop Well; To determine whether such appropria- 
tion shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds or other- 
wise, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Edwin Damon moved that the Town adopt the fol- 
lowing vote: Voted: That $72,500. is appropriated for the cost of installing 
a treatment system to the Winthrop #1 Well Field and that to meet 
this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, be authorized to issue $72,500. in bonds under Chapter 44, 
Section 8(4) of the General Laws as amended. Seconded. Mr. Damon 
stated this proposal was to try to clean up Winthrop Well water so that 
there will be approximately 500,000 gallons of water per day available. 
The Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committe unanimously recom- 
mended. The motion was defeated on a hand vote of 363 for, 292 against; 
two-thirds was necessary. 

Article 4: To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
for water well exploration at various locations within the town; To deter- 



40 



mine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer 
from available funds or otherwise; or take any other action relative thereto. 
Selectman Adele Robertson moved that the Town adopt the 
following vote: Voted: That $50,000. is appropriated for the cost of the 
development of additional well fields within the Town and to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
is authorized to issue $50,000 , under Chapter 44, Section 8(5) of the Gen- 
eral Laws as amended. Seconded. The Board of Selectmen and the Finance 
Committee both recommended. On a hand vote, the motion carried 635 
to 8. 

Article 5: To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of constructing an extension of the water system from 
Fowler's Lane along Town Farm Road to Greenspoint Road; To deter- 
mine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer 
of available funds or otherwise; or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved that this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Seconded. Motion caried on a voice vote. 

Article 6: To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
for payment of legal charges and expenses incident to the Town instituted 
appeal in the Matter of McCaffrey, Trustee vs. Ipswich Zoning Board of 
Appeals; To determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by 
borrowing, transfer from available funds or otherwise; or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum 
of five thousand dollars ($5,000.) from available funds in the Treasury 
(free cash) to the Legal Department, Outside Counsel Account, for pay- 
ment of legal charges and expenses incurred by the Town-instituted appeal 
in the matter of McCaffrey, Trustee vs. Ipswich Zoning Board of Appeals. 
Seconded. The Board of Selectmen recommended three to two in favor. 
The Finance Committee recommended nine to zero against, with Mr. 
Dalton stating that Town Counsel Vincent had recommended that the 
matter not be taken to court. He felt the bill, $7,200. to appeal one zoning 
case, was way out of line, and suggested it be resubmitted to the attorney 
with a request that he put it in again at a more modest figure. 

Zoning Board Chairman Bucklin spoke for the article; Mr. Bamford 
spoke against. Mr. Silvia suggested amending the figure to $2,500. Seconded. 
Motion defeated on a voice vote. On the original motion, the voice vote 
was against the article. 

Article 7: To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
to the Essex County Retirement Board for commitment due in Fiscal 
1976; To determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by bor- 
rowing, transfer from available funds or otherwise; or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$44,191. from available funds in the Treasury (free cash) to the Miscel- 



41 



laneous Finance County Retirement Account. Seconded. Mr. Cobb stated 
that the Town has received a bill for an additional amount from the County 
Treasurer. The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. The 
Finance Committee reluctantly recommended. Mr. Cobb, Mr. Dalton, 
and Town Accountant Leet explained the retirement system; Town Counsel 
reminded that the Town had no option. The motion carried on a voice 
vote. 

Article 8: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
to the School Account to pay an outstanding bill to the Electric Light 
Department; To determine whether such appropriation shall be raised 
by borrowing, transfer from available funds or otherwise; or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Chairman Paul Gahm of the School Committee moved that the 
Town vote to appropriate the sum of four thousand, seven hundred fifty 
dollars ($4,750) from available funds in the Treasury (free cash) to the 
School Department Account to pay an outstanding bill to the Electric 
Light Department. Seconded. Mr. Cobb stated that the Board of Selectmen, 
as Electric Light Commissioners, recommended in favor unanimously. 
The Finance Committee recommended eight to one (Emery) in favor. 
Mr. Silvia reminded that this motion would need a nine-tenths vote to 
pass. The vote was 460 in the affirmative, 165 in the negative. With 544 
affirmative votes needed, the motion was defeated. 

Article 9: To see if the town will accept the provision of the Acts of 
1971 , Chapter 899 which amends General Laws Chapter 59 and adds Sec- 
tion 21 A entitled: Additional Compensation for Assessors and Assistant 
Assessors Awarded Certificates, etc. 

Selectman John Pickard moved that the Town vote to accept 
the provisions of the Acts of 1971, Chapter 889, which amend General 
Laws, Chapter 59, and adds Section 21 A entitled: Additional Compensa- 
tion for Assessors and Assistant Assessors Awarded Certificates, etc., and 
to meet said provisions the sum of one hundred fifty dollars ($150.) is 
transferred from available funds in the Treasury (free cash) to the Asses- 
sor's Salary Account. Seconded. Part-time Assessor John Hephy has 
just been awarded his Certificate and the Board feels he should be compen- 
sated. The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended Mr. Morison 
stated that the Finance Committee was unanimously against the motion, 
feeling that it was not appropriate to change the budget at this time. How- 
ever, Mr. Heaphy's achievement should be recognized at budget time. 
The motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

ARticle 10: To see if the town will accept the provision of Acts of 1973, 
Chapter 164A, Sections 1-27 inclusive and entitled: New England Power 
Pool. 

Selectman Merle Pimentel moved that tbe Town vote to accept 
the provision of the Acts of 1973, Chapter 164A, Sections 1-27 inclusive 
and entitled: New England Power Pool. Seconded. The Board of Select- 



42 



men recommended. The Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 11: To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of conducting a Fair Cash Value revaluation of all prop- 
erties in the Town: To determine whether such appropriation shall be raised 
by borrowing, transfer from available funds or otherwise; or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town adopt the following vote: 
Voted: That eighty thousand dollars ($80,000.) is appropriated for the 
cost of conducting an expert Fair Cash Value revaluation of all properties 
in the Town and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to issue bonds in the amount 
of $80,000. under Chapter 44, Section 7(18) of the General Laws as a- 
mended. Seconded. Mr. Cobb stated that the Selectmen had agreed to put 
this article in the Warrant on the request of Outer Linebrook residents. 
The Board of Selectmen recommended in favor; the Finance Committee 
was four to five against the motion. Mr. Dalton, Mr. Damon, Mr. Barn- 
ford spoke against the article; Mr. Morison and Jacob Hoffman of the 
Citizens for Fair Assessment spoke in favor. On a hand vote, the motion 
lost 186 to 492. 

Article 12: To* see if the town will appropriate a sum of money to oil 
Appomatox Road and Chattanooga Road or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Un- 
animous voice vote. 

Article 13: To see if the town will vote to petition the General Court 
under Article II, section 8, of the Amendments to the Constitution of the 
Commonwealth to adopt the following law relating to the Town of Ipswich: 

"An Act authorizing the Town of Ipswich to obtain water from the 
Ipswich River. 

Be it enacted etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The Town of Ipswich is hereby authorized to take water 
from the Ipswich River or its tributaries in the Town of Ipswich, provided 
that the flow rate of the river as measured at the so-called Sylvania dam 
is not less than fifty million gallons per day, in accordance with such 
conditions as may be required by the Department of Health. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage." 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town vote to petition the General 
Court under Article 11, Section 8 of the amendments to the Constitution 
of the Commonwealth to adopt the following law relating to the Town 
of Ipswich: "An Act authorizing the Town of Ipswich to obtain water from 
the Ipswich River. Be it enacted etc., as follows: 

Section 1 . The Town of Ipswich is hereby authorized to take water from 
the Ipswich River or its tributaries in the Town of Ipswich, in accordance 
with such conditions as may be required by the Department of Health. 
Subject to rights previously granted by statute. 



43 



Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage." 

Seconded. The Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee recom- 
mended in favor. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

A motion was made the meeting adjourn. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote. The meeting stood adjourned at 10: 12 p.m. 

Attest: A true copy 

Harold G. Comeau, Town Clerk 



44 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Seated: John M. Pickard, Charles K. Cobb, Jr., Chairman 
Standing: Adele C Robertson, Edwin H. Damon, Merle R. Pimentel 

(House ofHinlin Photo) 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Charles K. Cobb, Chairman 

This year the Board acquired two new members, a new clerk, and a 
new office on the ground floor of the renovated Town Hall. The Board 
has continued to enjoy a good working relationship with the Town Manager 
and reached several important policy decisions during the year. 

The Kimball Brook reservoir proposal, which had been before the Town 
since 1967, was decisively defeated by a special town meeting in June. 
This action opened the way to the approval of a renewed search for ground 
water, which has revealed the existence of at least two promising sources, 
now being tested further. Although the Board also supported the con- 
struction of a treatment plant at Winthrop Well No. 1 to cure an iron 
problem which renders the water unusable during a large part of the year, 
a special town meeting held in November failed to appropriate the $72,500 
required. Sooner or later such a plant will have to be built, if the Town 
is to make economical use of its available water supply. 

Another problem that the Town still must face is that of sewage dis- 
posal. Individually, we have chosen to have flush toilets, dishwashers 
and washing machines. Collectively, the Town has chosen to permit building 
in such concentration that ordinary septic systems cannot dispose of these 
domestic wastes. Without reversing these choices, a sewer system is the 
only practicable means of removing these wastes. The Board will continue 
its efforts to convince the Town Meeting of the seriousness of this problem. 



45 




TOWN MANAGER 

Leonard J. Silvia 

The compilation of reports which comprise the ' 'ingredients' ' of the 
Annual Town Report tend to be somewhat mundane. They do, however, 
offer a rather concise narrative of what has transpired over the past year. 

Hopefully, you will find this report both traditionally attractive as 
well as functionally useful. For economy's sake, once again this year, the 
physical size of the document and related text is shorter than in most 
recent years. 

This past year has been one of substantial "organizational" and "struc- 
tural" changes in the town's approach to government. It is my hope that 
these changes will increase efficiency and productivity. Citizen demands 
for expanded municipal service have to be met realistically with ample 
consideration for the economics of the 1970's. 

Let us continue to establish an objective and effective system of govern- 
ment and I urge you to come forward with suggestions to better serve 
the future of Ipswich. 



46 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 



Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1975 



TOWN OP IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1975 





ASSETS 




LIABILITIES & RESERVES 




CASH 






AGENCY 




General 




575,205.57 


County Dog Collections 


204.00 


Revenue Sharing 


17,631.94 


Group Insurance Deductions 


13,489.66 


Petty: 






OME Insurance Deductions 


530.26 


Accounting 


5.00 


Life Insurance Deductions 


413.14 


Schools 




235.00 


Tax-sheltered Annuities 


221.53 


Electric 




60.00 


Uniform Deductions 


(14.81) 


Advance: 


14,843.78 


Payrolls 




593.51 
593,731.02 


GUARANTEE DEPOSITS 
Bid & Performance Bonds: 




CERTIFICATES 




Meadowbrook Subdivision 


4,023.74 


Revenue 




1,200,000.00 


Heartbreak Developers 


7,000.00 


Revenue Sh 


aring 


250.000.00 


Electric Meters 


9,180.00 






1,450,000.00 


Electric Meter Income 


5.372.64 


ACCOUNTS RECE 






25,576.38 


Taxes : 






TAILINGS 




Real Estate: 




Unclaimed Checks 


4,862.20 


Levy of 


1972 


66.08 






Levy of 


1973 


3,984.88 


TRUST & INVESTMENT FUNDS 




Levy of 


1974 


7,500.03 


Conservation Fund 


105,525.36 


Levy of 


1975 


97,576.40 






Levy of 


1976 


(2,214.00) 


FEDERAL GRANTS 




Personal 


Property: 




Schools: 




Levy of 


1966 


3.30 


Title I 


1,105.59 


Levy of 


1967 


56.25 


Title II - 1973 


2.60 


Levy of 


1969 


110.40 


Title II - 1974 


232.66 


Levy of 


1970 


278.60 


Title III 


3,650.26 


Levy of 


1971 


310.80 


Title VIB 


33.88 


Levy of 


1972 


358.40 


Title VIB 


95.28 


Levy of 


1973 


2,208.25 


Title VIB 


104.55 


Levy of 


1974 


144.38 


Vocational Education 


(481.72) 


Levy of 


1975 


4.919.91 


Others: 








115,303.68 


Historical - Title VII 


3,230.67 


Excise: 






Environmental Protection 


6,460.00 


Motor Vehicles: 




Revenue Sharing 


267.738.40 


Levy of 


1964 


1,560.38 




282,224.22 


Levy of 


1965 


2,801.31 


STATE GRANTS 




Levy of 


1966 


290.41 


Youth Commission 


223.31 


Levy of 


1967 


1,333.02 


Shellfish Propagation 


7,540.00 


Levy of 


1968 


382.49 


Bicentennial Commission 


600.00 


Levy of 


1969 


171.94 


Special Education 766 


17,802.56 


Levy of 


1970 


1,089.72 


Special Recreation 766 


398.54 


Levy of 


1971 


1,237.88 




26,564.41 


Levy of 


1972 


6,775.87 


OTHER GRANTS 




Levy of 


1973 


16,664.38 


Ipswich Historical Society 


2,773.85 


Levy of 


1974 


35,650.79 


Ascension Memorial Church 


200.00 


Levy of 


1975 


70.433.08 
138,391.27 


REVOLVING ACCOUNT 


2,973.85 


Farm Animals: 




School Lunch 


1,577.78 


Levy of 


1973 


20.00 


School \thletics 


2,209.77 


Levy of 


1974 


20.00 


Special Police 


48.00 



40.00 



3,835.55 



ASSETS 



Special 


Taxes: 


In Lit 


igation: 


Levy 


of 


1970 


Levy 


of 


1971 


Levy 


of 


1972 


Levy 


of 


1973 


Levy 


of 


1974 



Tax Title & Possessions: 
Tax. Title 
Tax Possessions 

Special Assessments: 
Sewer: 
Added to Taxes: Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1975 
Un apportioned 
Paid in Advance 
Committed Interest: 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1975 
Paid in Advance Interest 

Departmental: 
Town Property 
Engineering 
Health 

Veterans' Service 
Highway Machinery 
Cemetery 
Education 

Municipal Electric: 
Rates & Charges 

Water: 
Rates & Charges 
Added to Taxes: 

Levy of 1971 

Levy of 1972 

Levy of 1973 

Levy of 1975 

Sewer: 
Rates & Charges 
Added to Taxes: 

Levy of 1971 

Levy of 1972 

Levy of 1973 

Levy of 1975 



TOWN OF 


IPSWICH 




MASSACHUSETTS 




BALANCE SHEET ■ 


■ JUNE 30, 1975 

LIABILITIES & RESERVES 
APPROPRIATION BALANCE 






General 7 


,026,092.74 


429.34 


Revenue Sharing 


424.893.54 


428.72 


7 


,450,986.28 


428.11 


UTILITY BALANCES 




420.18 


Electric: 




201.29 


Operations 


(33,147.25) 


1,907.64 


Construction 


9,027.74 




Bond Proceeds -Plant Enlargement 


237.04 


19,486.72 


Building Construction 


7,807.96 


7.809.28 


Depreciation 


79.944.47 


27,296.00 


Water: 


63,869.96 




Maintenance & Operation 


249,248.75 


92.12 


Dow's Reservoir 


516.69 


7,728.51 


Construction 1969 


430.71 


377.98 


1970 


5,556.39 


12,344.13 


1971 


1,395.55 


(93.08) 


1973 


29,713.34 




1975 


315,400.00 


121.10 


Plant & Investment 


65.081.56 


322.50 




387,342.99 


79.04 


LOANS AUTHORIZED & 




20,972.30 


UNISSUED 


732,400.00 


1,441.48 


OVERESTIMATES 1975 




45.00 


County Tax 


3,875.60 


172.14 


Recreation Areas 


450.45 


27,523.49 


Metropolitan Air Pollution 


201.55 


690.63 


Ipswich River Watershed 


10.01 


62.50 


Mosquito Control 


1,569.47 


1.180.00 


Special Education 766 Assessment 


6.384.00 


31,115.24 


RECEIPTS RESERVED FOR 


12,491.08 


184,790.70 


APPROPRIATION 






Road Machines 


25.00 




Sale of Cemetery Lots 


10,344.95 


45,548.33 


County Dog Refund 


1,429.19 




Water Pollution Control 


3,270.00 


162.63 


Aid to Libraries 


4.031.25 


(104.03) 




19,100.39 


198.87 


OVERLAYS -RESERVED FOR 




1.101.94 


ABATEMENTS 




46,907.74 


Levy of 1967 


56.25 




Levy of 1969 


110.40 


22,446.28 


Levy of 1970 


278.60 




Levy of 1971 


310.80 


23.52 


Levy of 1972 


421.12 


(71.77) 


Levy of 1973 


6,193.13 


19.29 


Levy of 1974 


7,644.41 


32.37 


Levy of 1975 


9.464.60 


22,449.69 




24,479.31 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1975 



ASSETS 




LIABILITIES & 


RESERVES 




Aid to Highways: 




OVERLAY SURPLUS 






State 


64,917.66 


Reserve Fund 




88,518.02 


County 


30.085.00 










95,002.66 


REVENUE RESERVED UNTIL C01 




Federally-aided Public 




Motor Vehicle Excise 




137,984.47 


Works Project: 


2,088,700.00 


Farm Animals 
Sewer 




40.00 
43,414.86 


Due from Revenue Sharing: 


425,000.00 


Special Tax 

Tax Title & Possession 




1,907.64 
27,296.00 


OTHER ASSETS 




Departmental 




31,115.24 


Loans Authorized: 




Municipal Light 




184,790.70 


Sewer 3/7/66 


343,000.00 


Water 




46,907.74 


Water 3/5/73 


160,000.00 


Aid to Highways 




95,002.66 


Sewer 3/3/75 


229,400.00 


Federally-aided P.W. Project 


2,088.700.00 




732,400.00 






2,657,159.31 


UNDERESTIMATED ASSESSMENTS 




RESERVE FOR PETTY CASH 






Metropolitan Area Planning 


623.50 


ADVANCE 




300.00 


Veterans' District 


137.00 
760.50 


SURPLUS REVENUE 
General 




347,097.01 


REVENUE 1976 


6,359,508.23 


Municipal Electric 
Water (deficit) 
Sewer 




75.48 

(11,060.21; 

95.111.30 



431,223.58 



12,334,276.67 



12,334,276.67 



Source: Town Accountant 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1975 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



NET FUNDED OR FIXED DEBT 


SERIAL LOANS 




Inside 968,000.00 


Inside Debt Limit: 




Outside 290,000.00 


General: 




Public Service 713,000.00 


Sewer Construction 


928,000.00 




Payne School Renovation 


20,000.00 




Fire Equipment 


20.000.00 
968,000.00 




Outside Debt Limit: 






General: 






Sewer Construction 


260,000.00 




School Construction 


30.000.00 
290,000.00 




Public Service Debt: 






Electric 


343,000.00 




Water 


370.000.00 




ACCOUNTS 


713,000.00 


1.971.000.00 
DEFERRED REVENUE 


1.971.000.00 




APPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 


APPORTIONED SEWER REVENUE DUE 




NOT DUE 178,779.02 


1975 
1976 


16,576.39 




16,255.99 


SUSPENDED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 


1977 


14,672.43 


NOT DUE 2.502.00 


1978 
1979 


14,370.07 




13,296.28 




1980 


12,304.18 




1981 


11,649.54 




1982 


11,430.52 




1983 


9,738.24 




1984 


7,931.54 




1985 


7,515.59 




1986 


7,515.59 




1987 


7,014.87 




1988 


6,798.98 




1989 


6,093.52 




1990 


4,804.05 




1991 


4,641.67 




1992 


3,747.06 




1993 


2.422.51 
178,779.02 




SUSPENDED SEWER REVENUE 


2,502.00 


181,281.02 


181,281.02 



Source: Town Accountant 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1975 
TRUST and INVESTMENT FUNDS 



CASH and SECURITIES 
In Custody of Treasurer 

In Custody of Trustees 



505,736.26 In Custody of Treasurer: 
Animal Fund: 

Mrs. William G. Brown 
Cemetery Funds: 

Perpetual Care 

Flower Fund 
Investment Funds: 

Stabilization 
Library Funds: 

John C. Kimball 

Park Funds: 
Appleton Memorial Fountain 
Martha I. Savory Tree 
Dow Boulder 
R.T.Crane Picnic 

School Funds: 
Eunice C. Cowles 
Mark Newman 
Marianna T. Jones 



In Custody of Trustees: 
School Funds: 

Burley Education 

Brown School 

Manning School Funds 

Feoffees of Grammer School 
Library Funds: 

Tread we 11 

Building Fund 

Heard 

Lathrop 

Abby Newman 

George Spiller 

Memorial Book 

Wales Endowment 



1,215.24 

178,844.73 
10,608.75 

241,247.68 

847.89 



1,870.53 

1,010.06 

441.29 

45,782.80 

10,769.64 

10,486.81 

2.610.84 

505,736.26 



23,974.88 

24,835.73 

10,412.36 

1,878.01 

5,866.56 

1,812.05 

1,175.89 

299.97 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1975 



Local 






Real Estate: 


Levy 


of 


1972 


Levy 


of 


1973 


Levy 


of 


1974 


Levy 


of 


1975 


Levy 


of 


1976 



Personal Property: 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1974 
Levy of 1975 

Farm Animal Excise: 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1974 

In Lieu of Taxes: 

Veterans' Abatements 
State-owned Properties 
Housing Authority 
Crane's Beach 

State Local Aid 
Lottery 

Chapter 70 School Aid 
Chapter 69 & 71 Special Education 

LICENSES & PERMITS 
Alcoholic Beverages 
Dealers 
Occupancy 
Building Permits 
Restaurants 
Shellfish 
Clam Permits 
Common Victualers 
Gas Permits 
Plumbing 
Septic Tanks 
Health 

Marriage Licenses 
Street Openings 
Firearms 

License to sell firearms 
Miscellaneous 

FINES & FORFEITS 
District Court 
Fines 
Restitution 



1,997.80 

13,073.17 

75,162.61 

4,098,591.12 



308.00 

2,651.99 

92,981.80 



57.00 
340.80 



5,417.22 

137,946.37 

864.00 

14.431.60 



26,096.42 
580,261.65 
164,005.71 



18,804.00 

104.00 

276.00 

2,214.30 

28.00 

3,920.00 

8,745.50 

87.00 

582.00 

666.00 

140.00 

346.00 

320.00 

220.00 

1,350.00 

40.00 

1.090.00 



2,813.50 
134.68 



4,191,038.70 



95,941.79 



397.80 



158,659.19 



770,363.78 



38,932.80 



2,948.18 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1975 



GRANTS & GIFTS 

Federal Revenue Sharing 

Entitlements 
Federal Grants 

ESEA Title 1 

ESEA Title II 

ESEA Title VIB 

Food Service USDA 

Sewer Treatment Plant 

State Grants 

School Transportation 

Vocational Education 

Food Service 

School Building Assistance 

Family & Child Service 

Transportation of Handicapped 

Regional School Reimbursement 

Special Education (Chapter 766) 

Sewer Construction Reimbursement 

Sewer Treatment Plant 

Water Pollution Control 

Highways 

Library Aid 

Marine Fisheries 

Bicentennial 

County Grant 
Dog Fund 

Other Grants 

Historical Society 
Chamber of Commerce 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 
Sewer 

Unapportioned 

Apportioned - Paid in Advance 
Added to Taxes: 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1975 

PRIVILEGES 

Motor Vehicle Excise 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1974 
Levy of 1975 

DEPARTMENTAL 

General Government 
Selectmen: 
Liquor ID 



246,121.00 

51,235.00 

2,500.00 

55,590.00 

43,504.70 

1,223,300.00 



104,734.09 

1,452.00 

17,689.22 

32,678.31 

18,201.10 

183.00 

77,822.19 

51,864.00 

2,400.00 

279,854.10 

3,270.00 

183,945.46 

4,031.25 

8,700.00 

600.00 



2,162.44 



2,500.00 
663.15 



29,116.28 
12,117.44 

102.90 
19,074.48 



363.00 

136.20 

25,971.51 

.325,845.99 

128,099.64 



1,622,250.70 



787,424.72 



2,162.44 



3,163.15 



60,411.10 



480,416.34 



22.00 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1975 

DEPARTMENTAL (cont.) 

General Government (cont.) 

Accountant: 

Casualty Insurance 12,000.00 

Workmen's Compensation 14,775.00 

Group Insurance 1,001.96 

Treasurer: 

Costs - Taxes 335.00 

Costs - Motor Vehicle Excise 1,686.00 

Tax Certificates 930.00 

Town Clerk: 

Recordings 667.50 

Certified Copies 572.50 

All Others 190.00 

Planning Board: 

Filing Fees 15.00 

Rules & Regulations 3.50 

Board of Appeals: 

Hearing Fees 632.00 

Conservation Commission: 

Miscellaneous 225.00 

Public Safety 
Police: 

Photocopies 

Special Duty 

Bicycle Registration 

Firearms Identification 
Sealer of Weights : 
Dog Officer: 

Health & Sanitation 
Health: 
Recycling 
Immunization 
Sanitation: 

Sewer Connection Fees 
Sewer Rentals 
Sewer Rent.nl Liens 
Levy of 1975 

Highways 

State (Chapter 90) 

Equipment Maintenance (Reimbursement) 

Veterans 

Reimbursement for Relief 

Schools 

Transportation - State Wards 1,042.22 

Tuition 7,780.00 

Sale of Lunches 131,274.77 

Athletic receipts 7,627.56 





33,055.46 


509.00 




13,349.00 




47.25 




944.00 




185.30 




109.00 






15,143.55 


1,608.96 




118.25 




670.00 




38,849.95 




1,136.33 






42,383.49 


1,471.88 




15,289.87 






16,761.75 


60,635.99 





60,635.99 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1975 



DEPARTMENTAL (cont.) 
Schools (cont.) 

Feoffees of Grammar School 
Miscellaneous 

Library 
Fines 
Miscellaneous 

Recreation 

Beach Stickers 
Swimming Program 

Unclassified 

Rental of Town Property 
Sale of Town Property 
Insurance Receipts 
Miscellaneous 

PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISES 
Electric 

Sale of Electricity 
Aid in Construction 
Insurance Receipts 
Income Depreciation 
Water 

Sale of Water and Services 
Liens: 

Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1975 



7,500.00 
3,144.58 



1,168.89 
1,272.65 



4,326.75 
1,108.00 



3,222.62 
186.00 
992.13 
512.24 



1,954,460.89 

4,910.00 

14,117.09 

3,401.2 7 

246,615.03 

307.60 
8,963.30 



158,369.13 



2,441.54 



5,434.75 



4,912,99 



2,232,775.18 



CEMETERIES 

Sale of Lots and Graves 

Openings 

Liners 

Tents 

Foundations 

INTEREST 

Electric Meter Deposits 
On: Taxes 

Assessments 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Investment Funds 
Trust Funds: Library 

Cemetery 
Federal Revenue Sharing 
Other 



1,820.00 

4,448.00 

35.00 

645.00 

1,248.00 



2,124.28 

5,970.84 

9,423.15 

823.99 

96,560.69 

3,047.54 

14,815.49 

12,200.69 

6,166.78 



8,196.00 



151,133.45 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1975 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

Temporary Loans 

Antic. Federally-aided DPW 400,000.00 

Antic. Sewer Treatment Serial Loan 340,000.00 

Serial Loans 

Sewer Treatment Plant 340,000.00 

Premiums 244. 12 



AGENCY, TRUSTS & INVESTMENTS 

Dog Licenses for County 2,262.10 

Electric Meter Deposits 7,750.00 
Payroll Deductions: 

Group Insurance 80,686.19 

Tax-sheltered Annuities 18,613.65 

Uniform Deductions 1,635.56 

Trusts: Cemetery Perpetual Care 5,554.00 

Conservation Fund 1,219.86 

Investments: Investment Fund Securities 5,100,000.00 

Federal Revenue Sharing 650,000.00 



REFUNDS 

General Government 30,209.43 

Public Safety 235.22 

Highways 265.32 

Veterans 2,095.71 

Schools 11,915.65 

Library 208.45 

Recreation 131.97 

Title I 530.58 

Title VIB 2,396.58 

Electric 14,463.44 

Cemetery 68.80 

County Tax 1,774.15 

All Others 21.40 



1,080,244.12 



5,867,721.36 



64,316.70 



TOTAL RECEIPTS 17,957,636.15 



Source: Town Accountant 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
For the Fisc.il Year Ending June 30, 1975 



DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES 
Appropriation 
Revenue Sharing 

FEDERAL GRANTS 
Title I, ESEA 
Title II, ESEA 
Title VIB 
Title VII, HUD 

STATE GRANTS 

Mass. Shellfish Reimb. 
Youth Commission 

PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISE 
Electric 
Operation 6* Maintenance 
Building Construction 
Construction 
Depreciation Fund 
Water 
Operation & Maintenance 
Construction 
Plant & Investment 

STATE & COUNTY ASSESSMENTS 
State Recreation Areas 
Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Shellfish Purification 
Mosquito Control 
Ipswich River Watershed 
Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
State Assessment System 
Audit of Municipal Accounts 
Mass. Bay Transportation Assn. 
County Tax 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 
Maturing Debt 

General 

Electric 

Water 
Interest on Maturing Debt 

General 

Electric 

Water 
Temporary Loans 

Anticipation of Serial Issue 

Anticipation of Federal Grant 
Interest on Temporary Loans 

Anticipation of Serial Issue 

Anticipation of Federal Grant 



7,832,448.48 
77,750.85 



51,615.10 

27,505.85 

47,344.81 

1,568.85 



2,214.00 
514.09 



1,898,697.00 

40,991.26 

35,479.50 

112,711.19 

135,459.79 
1,630.67 
8,613.21 



45,579.69 

560.14 

1,161.00 

1,257.67 

16,077.73 

290.34 

1,615.65 

447.52 

464.69 

10,387.09 

195,366.46 



302,000.00 
56,000.00 
60,000.00 

53,072.64 
18,829.00 
. 9,045.00 

340,000.00 
400,000.00 

6,695.11 
2,256.76 



7,910,199.33 



128,034.61 



2,728.09 



2,233,582.62 



273,207.98 



1,247,898.51 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1975 



AGENCY 

Veterans' District 

Dog Licenses for County 

Bid & Performance Bond Deposit 

Meadowbrook Development 

PCD 
Tailings 

State Withholding 
Retirement Deduction 
Union Dues 
Cash Advance 

Payroll 

Workmen's Compensation 
Health Insurance 
OME 

Life Insurance 
Tax-Sheltered Annuities 
Uniforms 

TRUSTS 

Cemetery 

Perpetual Care Bequest 

Income 
Flower Fund Bequest 
Income 

Conservation Fund 

Other Funds 

John P. Kimball - Income 
Mrs. Wiliiam G. Brown - Income 
Marianna T. Jones - Income 
Richard T. Crane - Income 
Richard T. Crane 
Eunice C. Cowles 
Eunice C. Cowles 
Mark Newman - Income 
Martha I. Savory - Income 
Dow Boulder - Income 
Appleton Memorial - Income 
Library Trust Fund 
Library Building Fund 

INVESTMENT 

Certificate of Deposit 
Revenue 

Federal Revenue Sharing 
Stabilization 

REVOLVING 
Cafeteria 
Athletics 
Police 



Picnic Expense 

Income 

Scholarship 



14,229.16 
3,038.35 

13,607.86 

10,000.00 

4.88 

9,906.39 

5,398.17 

224.50 

4,883.60 

173.57 

75,537.26 

1,936.20 

1,843.03 
20,211.99 

1,492.89 



5,064.00 

14,300.96 

1,050.00 

514.53 

1,769.31 

34.45 

86.43 

194.50 

1,172.17 

2,347.56 

697.08 

600.00 

781.26 

89.08 

25.60 

138.65 

2,312.82 

734.72 



5,200,000.00 

900,000.00 

19,756.65 



192,840.63 
6,787.03 

14,159.00 



162,487.85 



31,913.12 



6,119,756.65 



213,786.66 



DETAILED STATEMENT OP PAYMENTS 

For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1975 

REFUNDS 

Taxes 25,298.96 

Sewer Assessments 379.53 

Motor Vehicle Excise 7,392.67 

Electric Accounts Receivable 484.20 

Water Accounts Receivable 557.82 

Electric Meter Deposits 9,640.09 

Health Insurance 78.59 

County Tax 538.78 



44,370.64 
TOTAL PAYMENTS 18,367,966.06 



Source: Town Accountant 



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BROVN SCHOOL FUND 



TREASURER'S REPORT 7th FEBRUARY 1976 



Balance 31st December 1974 

Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 
School gift as per invoice 

Interest thru 30th January 1976 



4187.01 

1005.78 

3181.23 

222.24 



3403.47 



Balance 3rd January 1975 

Ipswich Savings Bank 
Interest thru 30th January 1976 



2988.89 
174.31 



3163.20 



Total Balance 30th January 1976 



6566.67 



J. Perry Smith 
Treasurer 



Certified: 

Charlotte E. Terry 
7th February 1976 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 



BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1976: 



$12,029.7] 



INCOME FROM FUNDS FOR YEAR 1975 AS FOLLOWS : 

Interest - Ipswich Savings Bank 

Interest - Ioswich Savings Bank (Caldwell Fund) 

Dividend - Ipswich Co-Operative Bank 

Interest - Ipswich Co-Operative Bank -Term Deoosit 

Total Income 



$ 91.09 

251.82 

56.16 

379.23 



778.30 



EXPENDITURES: 



$12,808.01 



Safe Deoosit Box Rent 
Total Exnense 



$14.00 



14.00 



Respectfully submitted, 
BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

fV | / . J. ,, 

>-;-A.,.v-, (. ■■ -■■X 
Wilmot E. Hall, Treasurer 



$12,794.01 



BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1976 AS FOLLOWS : 

Deposited in Inswich Savings Bank 
Deoosited in Ipswich Savings Bank (Caldwell Fund) 
Ioswich Co-Operative Bank - Paid Up Certificate 
Ipswich Co-Operative Bank - Term Deoosit 

Total Invested Funds 



1,462.24 
4,934.60 
1,000.00 
5,397.17 



$12,794.01 



TRUSTEES OF MANNING SCHOOL FUND 
Donald F. Whiston and David C. Williams . Sr. 

MANNING SCHOOL FUNDS 

January 1, 1973 

Balance in Account #14293, Ipswich Savings Bank $50,769-53 

Balance in Account #7884, Ipswich Savings Bank 25,190.30 

Balance in Account #1995, Ipswich Co-operative Bank 15,823.64 

$91,783.47 

Income from Interest and Dividends 6,000.56 

$97,784.03 

Less Disbursements: 



Rental of Safe Deposit Box $ 7.00 
Supplies for Ipswich High School 3.364.37 



276 Shares, First National Bank of Boston $2,998.20 
20 Shares, Ipswich Co-operative Bank 4,000.00 



3i371-37 
$94.412.66 



ASSETS IN FUNDS 

December 31. 1975 

Balance in Account #14293, Ipswich Savings Bank $50,769.53 

Balance in Account #7884, Ipswich Savings Bank 25,190.30 

Balance in Account #1995, Ipswich Co-operative Bank 18,452.83 

$94,412.66 

SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 



6.998.20 
$ 101.410.86 



David C. Williams, Treasurer 



VITAL STATISTICS 

Harold Comeau, Town Clerk 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded for the past four years: 

1972 1973 1974 1975 

Births 109 115 121 107 

Deaths 154 140 138 124 

Marriages 123 137 123 138 

All the births recorded were to Ipswich residents (male 61 - female 46). 
Of the total numbers of deaths recorded, 75 were residents (male 36 - 
female 39). The age of the oldest Ipswich. resident was 104 years, 8 months 
and 24 days. 

DOG LICENSES 

Males 
Females 
Spayed Females 
Kennels 
Total 

CLAM PERMITS 

Residents 

Non-residents Daily 
Non-residents Yearly 
Total 

REGISTERED VOTERS (as of December 31, 1975) 

Precinct Democrats 

I 257 

II 433 

III 259 

IV 439 
Total 1388 

ELECTIONS (Town) 

The annual meeting for the election of Town officers was held in accordance 
with the warrant on Monday, March 10, 1975, from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 
The voting machine in Precinct I registered 924 ballots cast, Precinct II 
registered 1249 ballots cast, Precinct III registered 870 ballots cast, and 
Precinct IV registered 1181 ballots cast. 



MODERATOR 

Harold E. Shively 
Blanks 

SELECTMEN 

Edward Kozeneski 
Joseph A. Navarro 
C. Thomas Inman 





1974 


1975 




416 


790 




41 


97 




271 


. 610 




7 


12 




735 


1509 




757 


722 




278 


153 




341 


349 




1376 


1224 


Republicans 


Unenrolled 


Total 


528 


552 


1337 


602 


851 


1886 


422 


717 


1398 


431 


802 


1672 


1983 


2922 


6293 



Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 




729 


970 


689 


858 


3246 


195 


279 


181 


323 


978 


210 


325 


286 


516 


1337 


159 


288 


245 


335 


1027 


178 


152 


79 


142 


551 



47 



Robert J. Marcaurelle 
Merle R. Pimentel 
AdeleC. Robertson 
Brainard Wallace 
Blanks 



94 191 144 173 602 

445 542 356 394 1737 

575 672 464 454 2165 

59 135 70 140 404 

128 193 96 208 625 



CONSTABLE 

Bernie Spencer 
Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (3 years) 

Paul K. Gahm 
Ernest F. Brockelbank 
Thomas L. Moscarillo 
Richard A. Nylen 
Graham M. Reedy 
Earl J. Richards 
Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (1 year) 

Deanna S. Cross 
Laurien A. Levesque, Jr. 
Blank 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Stanley E. Eustace 
Richard B. Finnegan 
Blank 



762 


1061 


747 


948 


3518 


162 


188 


123 


233 


706 


451 


516 


427 


379 


1773 


528 


770 


479 


683 


2460 


311 


428 


297 


462 


1498 


523 


629 


439 


540 


2131 


235 


434 


343 


457 


1469 


212 


298 


181 


289 


980 


512 


672 


444 


733 


2361 


519 


623 


426 


487 


2055 


299 


475 


345 


549 


1668 


106 


151 


99 


145 


501 


597 


788 


540 


775 


2700 


210 


329 


226 


287 


1052 


117 


132 


104 


119 


472 




DEPARTMENT HEADS 

I to r - Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Cemetery Superintendent; Eleanor M. 
Crowley, Librarian; Bernie Spencer, Constable; George C. Mourikas, 
Treasurer /Collector; Peter S. George, Harbor Master; Armand T Michaud, 
Public Works Director; Edwin N. Bronk, Health Agent; Robert H. Leet, 
Accountant; Ralph L. Hebert, Building Inspector; Maura Quinn, Dog 
Officer; Harold G. Comeau, Town Clerk; Richard Sheppard, Shellfish 
Constable. (House of Hi nl in Photo) 



48 



IPSWICH YOUTH COMMISSION 

Cathleen R. McGinley, Director 

The year 1975 has been a challenging year for the Drop In Center. It 
has been a year of many problems and solutions. The past year has brought 
about a total "New Beginning" and a new image for the Drop In Center 
which will be recreational with clear rules and regulations for the Center's 
operation. The Youth Commission has taken a very clear step in regard 
to policy and guidelines. The Director will have full responsiblity for the 
operation of the Drop In Center and its staff. Many new programs have 
been established and carried out as follows: 

1 8 Dances Pool & ping pong tournaments 

4 Summer Concerts Creation of a complete game section 

8 Movies at the Center 

Ski Trip Arts & Crafts programs, such as 

Basketball Trip Macrame, Silk Screening and 

Camping Trip Handiwork 

Cookouts Trips to McDonalds monthly 

Major community projects the teenages have participated in are as follows: 

2 Townwide cleanups 

Lifeline to the elderly 

Tag Day for Council for the Aging 

Sweetheart Fair 

House Tour of Old Ipswich 

Lead paint screening clinic 

A special note of appreciation is extended to everyone in the community 
for their overwhelming support of our programs, activities and interest 
from the parents. A very special note of thanks is extended to the Police 
Chief and his Department for their support and concern of the teenagers 
in Ipswich. 



ASSESSOR'S OFFICE 

Varnum S. Pedrick, Chief Assessor 

The total assessed value of real estate and personal property committed 
to the Treasurer for collection was $73,048,957. This included nearly 
$300,000 in valuation of boats and snowmobiles. The total is an increase 
of more than 1.5 million over 1974. Fortunately, this increase helped the 
Town to survive the loss of one half million in state reimbursement with 
only a $4.50 tax rate increase. 

We also committed $512,010 in motor vehicle excise taxes which was 
an increase of $38,000 over the previous year. 



49 



Personal property valuation should level off this year as state lists of 
boats and snowmobiles become more accurate and taxing procedures for 
these vehicles become more stable. 

New single home construction and especially homeowner additions 
and improvements increased in Ipswich in 1975. This, along with new 
industrial and commercial development, may provide a decent gain in 
taxable property for fiscal 1977. 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Hollie A. Bucklin, Jr., Chairman 

The Zoning Board of Appeals held forty-three hearings in 1975, the 
highest number in its history. Of these requests, twenty-five were granted 
(six with conditions), seven were denied and eight were withdrawn with- 
out prejudice at the petitioner's request. Two requests were found not to 
need a variance and one not to need the Board's permission. 

The Board is presently involved in three court cases, in which the plain- 
tiffs are appealing the Board's decisions. 

The petitions presented to the Board over the past year covered a wide 
range; the majority involved lot and set-back requirements but 
others concerned horses, swimming pools, temporary installation of 
trailers, bait processing plant, land development, building in Limited 
Industrial area, appeal from a Board of Health decision, property con- 
veyance to the Town and over-expansion of a building. 

During the year, the resignation of S. Harold Perley, a Board member 
for many years, was accepted with regret. Sharon Josephson, a former 
Alternate, was appointed to fill his place. Alternate John R. Logan re- 
signed and was replaced by Thaddeus Maciejowski. 



TOWN COUNSEL 

F. Dale Vincent, Jr. 

In addition to the usual flow of problems of and advice to various 
town departments, the legal department has received an exceptionally 
large increase in its case load in the past year. There are twelve cases pending 
in Superior Court, one in Probate Court, one in Land Court and one in 
the District Court. 

These cases include possible liability on the Town for huge sums of 
money. One tort action seeks to obtain $100,000. Two of the cases involve 
the Firemen's collective bargaining contract. Others involve challenges 



50 



to decisions by the Board of Appeals and the Planning Board as to mat- 
ters that will have an important impact upon the Town and its development. 

Lastly there are many challenges to the assessed valuations by the Board 
of Assessors in the Appellate Tax Board, action as to which will have a 
serious affect on the Town's tax base and income. 



TREASURER-COLLECTOR 

George C. Mourikas 

The collection of taxes in this office was made much harder this year 
due to the inflation and recession which seemed the worst since the 1930's. 

More property was advertised this year for delinquent taxes than in all 
the last fifteen years combined. 

Letters were sent to the delinquents, followed up by telephone calls. 

As the Treasurer-Collector's Office is the financial nerve center for the 
Town, I am proud of my efficient staff; Sophie Rygielski, Assistant Treas- 
urer; Gloria Klimaszewski and Alice Keenan, Deputy Tax Collectors. 

In the collections of the utility department, there were two employees 
working under the CETA program who did an excellent job; namely 
Irene Lampropoulos and Leha Watts. 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John Conley, Chairman 

The Ipswich Historical Commision in October, 1975 published Some- 
thing to Preserve, the report of the Pilot Demonstration Project which 
has been in progress for several years. The Project, which was funded 
equally by the Ipswich Heritage Trust and the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development, demonstrates a method of protecting historic 
buildings by the acquisition of recorded Preservation Agreements. The 
Commission acquired sixteen Agreements on architecturally important 
Ipswich homes before the completion of the report and two additonal 
since then: 

Mr. and Mrs. D. Webster Stone, 4 Hovey Street 

Miss Ann Coppen, 100 High Street 

The Department of Housing and Urban Development, through its 
technical representative, David O. Johnson, has commended Something 
to Preserve and has informed us that the Department is planning to have 
the report reprinted by the Government Printing Office. Requests for it 
have been received from all parts of the United States and from Canada. 



51 



Mr. Johnson recommended to the Commission that the report be used as 
a basis for the Town to make an application to HUD for a block grant 
in preservation work. Such an application was filed on February 13 with 
the assistance of Paul McGinley. 

The Commission has carried on the routine work of preparing and re- 
painting plaques for historic homes- and has continued its program of 
updating the inventory of the Town's historic buildings and sites for the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Armand R. Brouillette, Chief 

The Police Department answered 9851 service connected complaints 
from local citizens, and covered 529 motor vehicle accidents in which 
132 persons were injured and 3 fatally. 

Wc have at present six qualified emergency medical technicians and 
three first responders trained in the department. The remaining eleven 
men will receive first responder training before the deadline of July 1977 
as required by state statute. 

I reported last year that surveys conducted of the operation of the 
department and the physical plant, required some changes. We have asked 
for additional personnel and expanded facilities. To this end we were in- 
creased in staffing by one man and a committee was formed to study the 
physical plant with instructions to come up with a recommendation for 
the Town whether to remodel or build anew. This committee was very 
active at first but has been allowed to disband when it became evident 
that no money would be appropriated in a tight economic year. 

We will again ask the Town to increase staffing by one man to bring 
us up to a recommended working standard for an agency the size of the 
Town. 

Below is a chart showing selected items of calls answered by local police 
for the last several vears: 

1973 1974 1975 

Breaking and Entering 130 141 - 26 Attempts 130- 34 Attempts 

Larcenies 294 375 428 

Stolen Cars 44 40 43 

Armed Robbery 2 4 

Sudden Deaths 14 9 9 

Malicious Damage 455 490 475 

Assaults 105 165 133 

Businesses Secured 578 425 489 

Accidents Town Roads 419 437 398 

Persons Injured Town Road 85 50 66 

Accidents State Roads 108 95 131 

Injuries State Roads 53 35 66 

Arrests 704 620 685 



52 



We also served 587 summons and 85 warrants and issued 235 motor 
vehicle citations. 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

John R. Harrigan, Director 

The principle aim of the Ipswich Civil Defense Organization is to protect 
the population, lives and goods against the natural and unnatural dis- 
asters, to mitigate their effects to bouy up the general state of mind and 
create a bond of mutual cooperation among individuals in time of emer- 
gency. 

The need of a Civil Defense Organization becomes more evident with 
the number of requests for assistance in 1975-1976, calls for assistance 
from Aux. Fire-Aux. Police Depts., and Communications group, also 
private citizens in trouble with flooding problems. To provide water in 
times of drought. Ipswich is in need of expanding Civil Defense when 
there is talk of disbanding in other towns, to substantiate this we submit 
the following summarization. 

During the year 1975/76 your local Civil Defense was called upon to 
assist in providing pumps, sand bags, emergency lighting and water to 27 
private citizens and 3 business establishments. However, new and modern 
pumps and rescue equipment is needed to maintain a proper state of 
readiness. 

A permanent central storage area was constructed in October which 
has allowed us to consolidate equipment and supplies to provide faster 
and more reliable dispersing when needed. 

A few of the many tasks performed by the Aux. Fire Dept. including 
reporting to 102 fire alarms, and completed courses in Fire Fighting tech- 
niques, Radiological monitoring and Search & Rescue. 

Throughout 1975 the Aux. Police Department continued to serve the 
Ipswich Community through the various volunteer services that it pro- 
vides in augmenting regular Police Department functions. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Theodore F. Mozdziez, Chief 

This year has been a year of several larger and serious fires for the 

department to cope with. This trend indicates a need for better manning 

per shift for immediate response. The present personnel compliment 

consist of: 

Permanent Force. 

1 . 3 Captains 

2. 14 Privates 



53 



Call Force: 

30 men with 3 Lieutenants. 

Fire Loss Report. 

Assessed value of property 

having fire $1,442,692 

Fire Insurance carried 2,883,795 

Fire Insurance paid 302,675 

Fire Response: 

Bell Alarms 102 

1 . Response by Permanent and Call Force 
Still Alarms 294 

1 . Response by Permanent Force 
Combined Total 396 

Past studies and comprehensive reports by the New England Rating 
Board, Gage and Babcock Co. and the Fire Study Committee have all re- 
commended more manning and a new sub-station. The current outlook for 
the coming year shows a need for a new forestry truck to replace the 32 
year old model. A new sub station in the outer Linebrook area is a necessity 
and should be supported by your action. I sincerely hope this can be 
accomplished this year as six to seven miles to respond to an emergency is 
a long, long way when minutes and seconds count. 

The Ipswich Fire Department continues to serve you on a 24 hour basis 
with permanent men on-duty at all times and supplimented by a call force 
on bell alarms. 

13 it >W ^v--pf< r i *f' W T s 





A UXILIAR Y POLICE 

Front row seated, left to right - Sgt. Stanley Trocki, Sgt. John Clogs ton, 
Lt. David Clements, Capt. Rudy- Provost, Lt. Charles Beaupre, Sgt. Charles 
Dodge. Middle row left to right - Patrolman Frank Pol tack, Corporal 
Larry Harvey, Patrolmen George Desrochers, Ernest Corbin, Bruce 
Klinger, John Harrigan, John Kenney. Back Row left to right - Patrolmen 
Guy Saulnier, James Zabelski, Horace Baldwin, Frank Gajewski, Mike 
Singer, Dennis Cameron, Donald Cole. Missing from picture - Patrolmen 
Robert Chambers, Robert McLeod, Richard Toleos, Thomas Inman. 

The Auxiliary Police serve the Ipswich Community through the various 
volunteer services that it provides in augmenting regular Police Department 
functions. 



54 



SHELLFISH ADVISORY COMMISSION 

Edward F. Paquin, Chairman 

This past year has been one of serious thought and action for the Shell- 
fish Advisory Commission. Our areas that were abundant with shellfish 
and worms have suffered a setback from causes that cannot be easily 
explained. 

The problem of "Red Tide" was with us again as was an increase in 
green crab population. This was also a year of increased permits being 
taken out, adding to a great pressure on all shellfish areas. 

The board has tried to come up with changes in the keeping with condi- 
tions on the flats. During the "Red Tide," a program of mussel removing 
was carried on to help men who were out of work from clamming. 

During the next year, it is hoped that the work on the flats can be in 
reseeding and cultivating the areas that were once productive, but are 
now barren. 

During the year there have been different proposals brought before the 
meetings dealing with ways of cleansing clams from an unclean area and 
then to replant in clean areas. Also, an attempt to start clam farms was 
brought up, but to date no more has been done on these subjects. 

HARBOR MASTER 

Pete S. George 

The year 1975 was a good boating year for the Town, and saw us through 
with no accidents. 

All areas were patrolled by the deputies; Al Hurd, Arthur Kapsalis and 
"Rocky" Haserlat. 

On several occasions, the Registry of Marine Recreational Vehicles, 
including the Director himself, assisted me in their Patrol Cruiser. Numer- 
ous citations were issued and were prosecuted in Court by the Registry. 

Considerable work was done on the mooring problem; citations were 
issued and some resulted in court cases that were prosecuted by me. 

On several occasions, we were called out for Search and Rescue missions. 
I would like to thank members of the Police and Fire Department, with 
special appreciation to Police Officer Ed Rauscher and Ken Nokes who 
with their high speed boats participated with me in these missions. 

A new boat, motor and trailer were purchased for the Harbor Depart- 
ment. Also, new channel and speed markers were purchased. 



55 



With the cooperation of the Electric Light and Public Works Depart- 
ments, the floats were put in the water and hauled out again for the season. 

Both the Eagle Hill and the Ipswich Rivers were marked. 

A Waterway Study Committee was formed which will enable us to solve 
any problems and to.make rules and regulations for the boaters. 

I have requested in the Harbor Department's 1976 budget the replacement 
of the upper platform, a rail for installation on the sea wall and a new 
gangway and float to be installed at the state built ramp so passengers can 
embark safely. 

I would like to emphasize to the citizens that the Harbor Master is a part- 
time position and occasionally, it is difficult for me to handle minor 
problems. To alleviate this problem, I suggest the Town have a full-time 
Harbor Master at least during the boating season. 



SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Richard Sheppard 

In 1975 there was one closing of the clam flats due to P.S.P. 

In 1975 there was one closing of the clam flats due to P.S.P. (so-called 
"red tide"), and the flats remained closed for eight weeks. 

With Technical Assistance money and Town money, full-time clam- 
mers and students were put to work on the flats for four days a week, 
at twenty- five dollars per day. The total money spent employing the clam- 
mers amounted to $ 1 3 ,425 .13. 

The men worked at destroying predators and at clearing three clam flats 
of mussels. The obvious enthusiasm of the workers proves that the clam 
industry is important to the Town of Ipswich, and more so now, with 
economic conditions such as they are. 

Permits Issued for 1975 

Permits to Residents over 60 (No Charge) 37 at $ .00 

Commercial 225 at $20.00 

Non Commercial: Resident Yearly 725 at $ 5.00 

Non Commercial: Non-Resident Yearly 349 at $25.00 

Non Commercial: Non-Resident Daily 158 at $ 5.00 




56 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Edwin N. Bronk, Agent 

In 1975 the following number of permits were issued: 

Plumbing Permits 1 1 5 

Gas Permits 99 

Burial Permits 103 

Landfill Stickers 250 

Permits were also issued for milk, restaurant, ice cream manufacturing, 
etc. 

Between March 1 and May 31, 1975, a total of 55 percolation and ground 
water tests were conducted, resulting in the approval of 39 sites for con- 
struction installation of septic systems and the disapproval of 16 sites not 
meeting the standards of Article XI of the State Sanitary Code. 

Clinics held in 1975: 

Rabies Clinic (May) - 162 immunizations 
Influenza Clinic (October) - 164 immunizations 

The Well Child Clinic is held on the first Monday of each month at 
the Winthrop School between the hours of 3:00 and 4:00 p.m. The clinic 
is operated for pre-schoolers only, offering medical examinations and 
the administering of immunizations for which no fee is charged. 

A Lead Paint Clinic was conducted in December and will be held annually, 
along with special inspections of house paint for those persons whose 
children are thought to be affected by lead paint. 

A total of 3600 units of biologies (including polio, tetanus, typhoid, 
measles, mumps, rubella, globulin, etc.) were distributed to local doctors 
and the hospital. 

The Recycle Center, located at the Town Garage area on County Road, 
is maintained five days a week from 8:00 to 4:00 p.m., and handles paper, 
glass and metal. 

VETERANS' SERVICES 

Frank Story, Director 
Massachusetts Veterans' Benefits 

The Veterans' Benefits Program assists and advises veterans and their 
dependents in obtaining benefits for which they have entitlement. The 
program deals with hardship resulting from disaster, illness, unemploy- 



57 



ment and strikes. It is difficult to estimate with accuracy the expenditure 
under this program. The number of veterans and their dependents re- 
ceiving assistance in the Town of Ipswich under Chapter 1 15 of the General 
Laws, as amended, is being reported as follows: January - 59, February - 
47, March - 53, April - 45, May - 58,^ June - 55, July - 34, August - 48, 
September - 53, October - 45, November - 41, December - 46. A total 
of 584 cases was processed-in 1975. There were 24 applications filed for 
the Vietnam Bonus. Exclusive of the bonus, 50% of the cost of the Benefits 
program is reimbursed by the State. Expenditures are listed in the financial 
statement of the Town Report. 

Veterans' Services - Federal 

The Veterans' Services Department aids veterans and dependents to 
establish eligibility and secure Federal Benefits for which they have entitle- 
ment from the Veterans Administration. In 1975 the following Federal 
services were rendered by this office: Request for Military Records - 8, 
Statement for Stoppage of Check - 4, Bronze Markers - 8, Change of 
Address - 25, Request for Information from Claimant's Folder - 24, VA 
Dental Claims - 14, Application for Medical Benefits - 6, Compensation 
& Pension Claims - 19, Income - Net Worth and Employment Status - 4, 
Widow's Pension - 7, Waiver of Retirement Pay - 2, Request for Approval 
of School Attendance - 22, Declaration of Marital Status - 3, Exam for 
Housebound Status - 2, Statement of Income & Net Worth - 32, Statement 
in Support of Claim - 40, Employment Questionnaire - 2, Request for 
Family Unusual Medical Expenses - 2, Program of Education -11, Change 
of School or Program-8, Power of Attorney-65, Eligibility Certificates- 18, 
Designation of Beneficiary-2, Claim for Life Insurance-5, Annual Question- 
naire Cards-71, Card for Medical treatment outside Clinic-2, Application 
for Champva-8, ID Cards-2, Abatement Certificates- 19, Treasury Checks 
Returned- 14, Social Checks Returned-8, Rx to Clinic-54, Appointments 
for Court Street-4, AGO Records-36, Applications for SS Disability-9, 
Wheelchairs-2, Referrals to VA Facilities- 18, Application to Tax Appellate 
Board-3. 

Compensations and pensions obtained for Ipswich veterans totaled 
$538,808.00 for the year. Hospitalization in VA facilities represented a 
savings of $63,000.00 to the Town. $25,000.00 for Educational Benefits 
was received by veterans and their dependents. The above categories 
represent a total saving to the Town of $626,808.00 in 1975. 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 

Alfred L. Tobiasz, Manager 

Office - 222 High Street, Office hours 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Tel. 356-4331 , 
4332. Emergency calls night, Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays call the 
Power Plant 356-3600. 



58 



The accounting firm of Coopers & Lybrand, Boston, Mass. completed 
a survey to evaluate the financial functions of the Electric Department. 
This phase of the survey included the review and evaluation of the organiza- 
tional structure, paper work flow, administrative and financial controls 
and the equipment and/or outside service bureau used in processing 
Light Department transactions. 

A second study by Coopers & Lybrand to start in 1976, will review 
cost and method of Electric Delivery Systems and to identify trends which 
are affecting Electrical Delivery in Municipalities, such as purchase of 
electricity versus local generation. 

Major Construction Proposed 

1. Extend 15 KV spacer cable on Linebrook Road from Newbury Road 
to Forest Park. 

2. Replace 5 KV cable along Linebrook Road from Forest Park to Tops- 
field Town Line. 

3. Install underground cables to proposed Housing Authority project on 
County Road. 

Construction Completed 

1. 15 KV spacer cable circuit to Fowler's Lane Sewerage Treatment 
Plant. 

2. Underground wires installed at Herrick Acres off Newbury Road. 

3. Cable replacement completed along Estes Street, Kimball, Peatfield, 
First, Second, Fourth, Fifth, Labor-in-Vain Road and Paradise Road. 

4. 20 Street lighting fixtures, 14 overhead services and 4 underground 
services, 10 poles, 37,840' of overhead wire and 3,785' of underground 
cables and 1 ,459 KVA of transformers were added to the system. 

Maintenance 

42 overhead and 5 underground services, 20 poles and 57 street lighting 
fixtures were replaced. 

Maintenance at the Generating Plant was carried out by the power 
plant personnel and all units are in good operating condition. A major 
overhaul of one unit will be undertaken in the spring by power plant 
personnel. 

The annual peak KW demand on our system was 12,700 kilowatts on 
December 24, 1975, which represents an increase of 6.72% over last year. 







Statistics 






Aver KWH used by 






Year 


Residential Customers 


KW Peak Demand 


Meters in Service 


1955 


2405 


3900 


3231 


1960 


2638 


5675 


3545 



59 



1965 


3273 7500 




3963 


1970 


5102 11200 




4306 


1975 


6005 12700 




4720 




Power Generated & Purchased 






1973 


1974 


1975 


Generated 


25,452,920 


19,969,280 


11,369,440 


Purchased 


33,233,684 


38,493,595 


48,786,170 


Total KWH 


58,686,604 


58,462,875 


60,155,610 


(This represents 


an increase of 2.90 percent) 







RECREATION - PARKS DEPARTMENT 

James H. Daly, Director 

Recreation Department 

Overall attendance at the nine staffed summertime playgrounds (1975) 
remained stable. Attendances, however, at certain play areas fluctuated 
depending on their size, location, facilities available, etc. Average daily 
attendance was set at 45 youngsters during the eight weeks of routine 
and special programs. Except for the usual skinned elbows & knees there 
were no injuries reported. 

Among the special events offered last summer were field trips to the 
Crane Castle grounds, the aquarium in Boston, the nature trail at Crane's 
Beach and Benson's Animal farm. Appearing in Ipswich were the Little 
Red Wagon theatre group and the zoomobile. All sorts of tourneys and 
field days were conducted at the playgrounds over the eight week period. 
Ipswich youngsters also participated in the annual Hula Hoop and Frisbee 
contests that stretch to National levels. 

The Director and other Recreation personnel assisted in depth in car- 
rying out the successful marathon races associated with Olde Ipswich 
Week and the July 4th parade and field day co-sponsored by the Rec. Dept. 
and the local V.F.W. Well over 200 residents in all age groups participated 
in the tennis tourney held at the Linebrook courts in August. 

Several members of the Rec. Committee were present in November 
when an appropriate plaque was presented to the late Albert Casali by 
Town Manager Leonard Silvia and Director James Daly. The momentum 
presented in behalf of the town was in appreciation for Mr. Casali making 
his land available for use as a playground for youngsters in the outer 
Linebrook area at no cost to the Town. 

Upwards of 600 youngsters took part in the swim instruction program 
that was carried out at the Don Bosco pool. Close to 500 in all age groups 
took advantage of the summer long tennis instruction courses. A token 
fee was assessed for adults while there were no charges involved for young- 
sters. 



60 



The Rec. office staff and the Director continued its long standing policy 
of assisting semi-private groups and recognized organizations in carrying 
out Recreation orientated plans & programs benefiting Ipswich residents. 
Spaces in the Memorial Building were made available for a variety of 
organizations for meetings, etc., all designed for the benefit of Ipswich 
youth. 

With people of all ages having more time for leisure activities and with 
their attention focusing on the outdoor activities the pressure on the use 
of town facilities (tennis courts & ball fields) has greatly increased in 
recent years. The new demands have been partially satisfied by the co- 
operation of the officials at Lasalette, Notre Dame and the Sacred Heart 
Juniorate (Don Bosco) who have made their facilities available for use 
by the Rec. Dept. and consequently the residents of Ipswich. Officials of 
the Fish & Game Club continue to make a section of their skeet field 
available for use as a summer playground activities. In all cases there 
are no costs to the town involved. 

Park Department 

The three man crew which increases to twelve in the peak of the season 
(spring, summer, fall) maintains and improves 13 ball fields, 9 playgrounds, 
8 tennis courts and all the lawns, commons, greens and special projects 
of the Light, Water & Highway Departments. The north & south greens, 
the Town wharf, Daniel Boone Park, the town parking lot at the beach, 
the two beaches at the Neck Causeway, certain traffic islands and a variety 
of other minute areas are all maintained by the Department. 

The base crew of 3 is kept busy in the mid winter months repairing 
mechanized equipment, repairing & repainting playground equipment, 
bleachers, benches, etc. The same crew also maintains the Memorial 
building and carries out major redecorating projects. Personnel & vehicles 
are utilized where needed in snow storms and often times assist other 
departments in menial chores. 



LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian 

Activity at the Public Library reached a new high during 1975, consistent 
with national trends indicating greatly increased levels of library use. A 
record number of borrowers charged out a total of 142,921 items; some 
47,165 persons used their public library facilities during the year, and 
approximately 21,919 reference questions and answers were recorded. 

High interest is noted in the areas of money management, job hunting, 
"how-to- fix-it" books, consumer information and business reference. More 
and more people are taking advantage of the library's magazine and period- 
icals collections as subscription costs to the individual soar. 



61 



The always popular story hours for pre-school children show increased 
enrollment, and* programs for adults ranging from slide presentations to 
a spinning demonstration have again been brought to the community by 
the Friends of the Library whose continuing involvement and interest is 
invaluable to the library. An outstanding activity of the Friends during 1975 
was the publication of "Historical Stories of Ipswich, Mass. 1600-1700" 
by the Children of Ipswich, a Bicentennial publication which is enjoying 
nationwide distribution. The Oral History project, "Ipswich Speaks" has 
completed an important slide/show presentation titled "A Good Place" 
by John Updike for showing and distribution during 1976. 

Appointed to three-year terms on the Board of Library Trustees were 
Daniel W. Poor, Jr., Judge Thomas A. Johnson and Alice Keenan. Mrs. 
Bruce Paul was named to fill the unexpired term of William Waitt. 

A significant number of important reference titles have been added to the 
Library's collections through an LSCA Title I Grant during 1975. The 
library's total holding now number 54,463 following the addition of 2,989 
new titles during 1975. 

Increasingly, the library's participation in the Eastern Massachusetts 
Regional Library System has enabled us to bring to our public improved 
service through interlibrary loan, including the film collections of the 
Boston Public Library. Daily truck delivery links the libraries in the Eastern 
Region. 

Your public Library takes pride in bringing to you the newest and the 
timeliest in recreational, information and educational materials. 



COMBINED BOOK CIRCULATION 

1974 vs. 1975 



VOLS. 






























9,000 






























8,500 


1975 




























8,000 








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A 














7,500 










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7,000 






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6,500 


1974 




i 




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\ V 


^k 


'1975 


6,000 












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*1974 


5,500 














Mr~ 
















MONTH 




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F 


M 


A 


M 


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Jy 


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D 





62 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Jane Bokron, Executive Director 

Arthur Weagle, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority currently administers three (3) Projects 
namely; 200-1 Family Units (24 at Southern Heights).. 667-C2 Elderly (20 
at Southern Manor and 100 at Caroline Avenue).. 77 Rent Subsidy Scattered 
Housing (Project 707). 

Proposed Elderly and Family Housing.. 94 Units (80 elderly and 14 Family) 
The Ipswich Housing Authority received the approved for Financial 
assistance on July 30, 1975. Local Planning Board and Zoning Board of 
Appeals have approved preliminary plans and it is expected that ground 
breaking may take place sometime during May 1976. 

Project 200-1-Low Income Family: These 24 Low Income Family Units 
built 1950 each has its own gas furnace, gas stove and gas hot water tank. 
The average shelter rent of $85.00 per month for 1-2-3-4 bedrooms units. 
Much has been done to improve these units. Wrought iron hand rails have 
been installed during 1975 and will be completed during 1976. Safety chain 
door locks were installed in all apartments. Trees were planted during 1975 
and more will be planted during 1976. 

Project 667-C2-Elderly: The 20 Elderly units at Southern Manor are heated 
by gas. These units were re-roofed during 1975. Wrought iron hand rails 
were installed in all units. The average rent is $57.00 per month. The 100 
elderly units at Caroline Avenue are all electric. The average rent is $70.00 
per month. Average age for both elderly projects is 77 years young. Flu 
shots are available annual for all tenants. Photographic identification cards 
were processed in the Recreation Hall. 

Rent Subsidy Project 707: This program provides subsidies for low income 
families, including elderly and disabled persons. It allows the Authority to 
rent privately owned apartments and pay a rent supplement to make up the 
difference in the agreed total monthly rent. The Ipswich Housing Authority 
paid a total of $80,207.00 during 1975 for rent subsidies to private landlords 
for 77 units. The average rent subsidy tenants paid was $78.00 per month 
while the Ipswich Housing Authority paid an average of $89.00 per month 
to the landlords for 1-2-3-4 bedroom units. 

Hot Lunch Program: On February 25, 1974 a pilot program for Hot Lunches 
was initiated for 50 elderly tenants at Caroline Avenue and Southern Manor. 
This highly successful program has made a tremendous impact on the 
elderly as this program is for congregate dining and elderly tenants now 
have an opportunity to socialize more. 

Tenant Representative Association: Tenant Representatives of all projects 
attend the regular monthly meetings of the Ipswich Housing Authority with 



63 



their complaints and suggestions. This group has been a tremendous help 
to the Authority. The Recreation Hall has a full calendar of Beano once a 
month, Birthday Parties, card playing, knitting groups and many other 
social activities. Mr. Percy Cheverie has directed two highly successful 
Minstrel Shows and is planning another during April 1976. These funds 
have been used to purchase a new piano and a sound movie projector for 
"Sunday Nite at the Movies." 

There were 3 deaths in the elderly project and 3 deaths in the family project. 
To their families, we extend our most sincere sympathy. 




Hot Lunch Program at the Recreation Hall, Ipswich Housing Authority 

'House of Hint in Photo) 



ESSEX COUNTY 
MOSQUITO CONTROL 

Robert W. Spencer, Superintendent 

The Essex County Mosquito Control Project was organized in 1965 and 
on July 12, 1975, completed ten years of service to the Town of Ipswich 
and twenty-one other communities in Essex County. 

While there are many who will disagree, much has been accomplished 
since 1965 in abating the mosquito both as a public nuisance and a public 
health hazard. The program of source reduction through drainage and 
water management and the annual treatment of chronic mosquito breeding 
plots have reduced greatly the numbers of mosquitoes emerging from 
fresh water wetlands, resulting in a noticeable lessening of the early sum- 
mer problem. 



64 



The coastal salt marshes continue as the greatest mosquito breeding 
potential along the Massachusetts north shore because of the many miles 
of neglected mosquito ditches. The Project has been working to remedy 
this situation since the acquisition of specially designed equipment in 
late 1967. The task, however, is monumental and in spite of the fact 
that 178,830 feet or nearly 34 miles of salt marsh ditching were recut 
in 1975, and many hundreds of miles have been recut since 1967, the job 
has just begun. 

A major change in the method of summertime spraying for adult mos- 
quitoes was undertaken by the Project in 1975. The old method of thermal 
aerosol fogging with insecticide and vaporized fuel oil was discarded in 
favor of the ultra low volume application of technical grade material in 
a much reduced dosage. The net result was greater coverage with less 
material and a more effective adulticiding program at less cost per acre 
treated. 

During April and May a total of 77 acres of fresh water mosquito breeding 
plots were treated by the application of a larvicide to the open water of 
woodland pools. 

The Project spray trucks were at work in Ipswich a total of 10 days in 
June, July and August. 

Employing power equipment the Project reclaimed a total of 525 feet 
of existing streams off Newbury Road, Argilla Road, Town Farm Road 
and in the vicinity of the Candlewood Golf Course. The brush was re- 
moved from sides of the banks of these streams and others, for a total of 
550 feet. 

The Project now has thirteen full time employees and owns ten highway 
vehicles. Four specially designed and equipped tractors are employed in 
the fresh water wetlands and salt marshes. 

The headquarters building on Haverhill Street in Rowley is located in 
the approximate geographical center of the 315 square mile district with 
convenient access to several major highways, the better to serve all mem- 
ber communities. 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Irving G. Small, Chairman 

The Government Study Committee held one formal meeting during the 
year on May 29, 1975. The purposes of that meeting were: (1) to organize 
the Committee for the term ending with the 1976 Annual Town Meeting, 
and (2) to hold a public hearing on the proposal, as presented in Article 
15 of the Warrant for the June 9, 1975, Special Town Meeting, for adop- 
tion of a new by-law establishing the date and time for the Annual Town 



65 



Meeting as either the first Monday in May at 7:30 P.M. or the first Saturday 
in May at 9:00 A.M. 

On the first question, the members of the Committee voted unanimously 
to elect Mr. Irving G. Small as Chairman and Mrs. Mary E. Williamson 
as Vice Chairman. On the second question, after considering recommenda- 
tions submitted by Town Manager Silvia, Selectmen Cobb, Robertson 
and Damon and Mrs. Jean Bucklin, the Committee voted unanimously 
to recommend adoption of the first alternative under Article 15. 

During the last week of November, the Committee Chairman, Mr. 
Small, and member, Mr. John Eby, met informally on two occasions to 
read and correct the printer's proofs of the Town's General By-laws 
prior to their publication pursuant to order of the Board of Selectmen. 



DOG OFFICER 

Maura Quinn 

1500 dog licenses were issued through the Town Clerk's Office in 1975. 
Approximately 250 dogs are unlicensed in Ipswich. 

With the adoption of the dog control by-law on July 1 , the number 
of complaints, as well as the number of animals confined in the pound, 
etc., has been extremely different compared to previous years. Court 
appearances have become a frequent occurance because of the violations 
of the leash law. Summons were issued for failure to license a dog. 

The public schools have been a main concern because of the number of 
dogs that seem to gather there. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the residents of Ipswich 
for their continued interest and cooperation; and I look to 1976 as a year 
of further progress. 

Animals reported lost 120 

Animals found 95 

Animals confined in Pound 175 

Animals returned to owner 75 

Animals disposed 70 

Animals injured 49 

Animals killed 60 

Animals killed by dogs 7 

Dog bites 34 

Complaints received and answered 1825 



66 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Variety is the best description of the Conservation Commission's efforts 
during 1975. Unanimous town meeting approval led to the acquisition of 
77 acres of the Marini Farm - a large, important property of significant 
watershed value. Benefits to Ipswich are many, including preservation of 
valuable farmland, maintaining open space, protection of our water supply 
and extending an existing wilderness trail system between Willowdale Forest 
and Dow Reservation. The Commission thanks the Marini family for the 
opportunity and their patience and effort on behalf of Ipswich. 

We continued the dune restoration program at Crane's Beach, thanks to 
efforts of High School students, town officials, the Forestry Department 
and Trustees of Reservations. 

Erection of a sign dedicating the Goodhue Canoe Landing culminated 
the dream of many local folks who started the movement with a dance 
several years ago, indicating so clearly that if you try hard enough, you can 
succeed. 

The Commissionn held four public hearings relative to the State Wetland 
Protection law, in addition to investigating several violations and responding 
to numerous citizens questions and complaints. 

We finally had completed in December an inventory of town forest lands 
to determine their viability, revenue potential for the town, value for fire- 
wood for citizens and best methods for managing the resource to its max- 
imum benefit to the public. 

The Conservation Commission joined with the Planning Board in a 
coordinated effort to prepare an Open Space Plan. Working with the 
Planning Advisory Committee, composed entirely of volunteers, a Natural 
Resources Inventory was completed, with the free technical assistance of 
the U.S. Soil Conservation Service and several University of Mass. students. 
As a result, a variety of resources such as farms, trees, wildlife and other 
resource types were inventoried and mapped. The Open Space Plan effort 
will ultimately enhance the value of Ipswich both economically and aesthetic- 
ally. This substantial effort was most successful because of the dedication 
and capabilities of Ms. Holly Scoville, a CETA employee. 

Lastly, through the efforts of many, all town maps have been reproduced 
on a common scale. This important project has yielded valuable information 
to the Commission, other town officials, and so many interested citizens 
having questions. 

We sincerely thank all of you for your continuing support. 



67 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Superintendent 

There were 86 interments in 1975 compared to 95 in 1974; 96 in 1973; 
109inl972andll7inl971. 

Two single graves; seven two grave lots; six four grave lots and one 
eight grave lot were sold with perpetual care. Four lots converted from 
annual care to perpetual care. Three lots established a perpetual flower 
fund. Three two grave lots and five four grave lots were awarded to veterans 
by the American Legion with no revenue for care of these lots. 

Fifty-two monument and marker foundations laid; twenty sets of cor- 
ner bounds set. Twenty-eight monuments repaired and re-set. Eleven of 
them caused by vandals. 

Re-serviced three avenues with two hundred fifty one tons of hot top. 
Twelve tree stumps removed. Fertilized and limed a section of Cowles 
Memorial and New Highland Cemetery. 

A new four wheel drive Chevy half-ton pick up was purchased replacing 
a 1970 International pick-up. 

A new cemetery building was started in November. This will be office, 
work shop and garage. Completion is scheduled for 1976. 

All Cemetery records were microfilmed up-to-date to protect us in case 
of loss by fire. 

Monies collected for first half of FY 1976 as follows: 

Interment openings $2,894.00 

Chapel tent rentals 375 .00 

Foundations and bounds 1 ,095 . 50 

Sale of lots and graves 910.00 

Annual care payments 387.50 

New perpetual care 1,040.00 

$6,702.00 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Armand T. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department underwent two changes during 1975. 
Armand T. Michaud was appointed director in October, and the depart- 
ment was re-organized separating the Water/Sewer Division from the 
Highway, Forestry, Equipment Maintenance, Town Hall and Town 
Garage Buildings and the Snow & Ice Divisions. 



68 



HIGHWAY DIVISION: 

Norman Stone, Foreman 

The Highway Division's chief responsibility is to maintain and repair 
the Town's streets and drainage systems. Additional work handled by the 
highway division includes the following: patching roads, repairing side- 
walks, cleaning catchbasirts, sweeping streets and installing street signs. 

Guard rails were replaced on Argilla Road, Linebrook Road and New- 
bury Road. 

Shoulders were cut back on Argilla Road, Candlewood Road and 
Chebacco Road. 

A few projects were completed, namely; the correction of a drainage 
problem on Kimball Avenue and the repairing of the Willowdale Bridge. 

Hot topping wearing surfaces was done to the following streets: 
♦Argilla Road Island Park Road 

Broadway Extension Perley Avenue North 

Brownville Avenue Perley Avenue South 

Caroline Avenue Ryan Avenue 

Fairview Avenue Vermette Court 

*Hot topped from North Gate Road to Crane's Beach. Funded through 
Chapter 90. 

A number of roads were oiled including: 

Applewood Drive Kent's Corner Road 

Arrowhead Trail Merganzer Road 

Bay View Road Newmarch Street 

Bunker Hill Road Old England Road 

Capeview Road Stage Hill Road 

Damon Avenue Tansey Lane 

Hillside Road Valley Drive 

The division's winter schedule mainly consisted of Snow & Ice Control 
which takes in plowing, sanding, salting and snow removal. 



FORESTRY DIVISION: 

Charles Foley, Foreman 

The- Dutch Elm disease has been a major concern this year. The Forestry 
Division removed 275 Elm trees and sprayed with dormant spray in an 
effort to contain the disease. A leaf spray was also sprayed on Elm trees 
for the leaf beetle. 

Approximately 35 dead trees, including Maples, were removed during 
the year. 



69 



Among the 375 new trees that were planted were Linden, Maple and 
Oak trees. A large percentage of these trees were distributed at the Meadow- 
brook area. On Arbor Day, 400 trees were given out; one to each first 
grader to take home, plant and care for. 

All areas of Town underwent 15 weeks of mosquito spraying. Due to 
the heavy brood of mosquitos, caused by the extra high tides, spraying 
was done twice, sometimes three times a week. 

A new program was launched which consisted of mowing the side of 
roads. This program lasted for a 10 week period and gave a fresh look to 
the Town's road sides. Brush was also cut back along 30 miles of road 
sides around town. 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION: 

John McParland 

During the first six months of the year, the Equipment Maintenance 
Division serviced and repaided Town vehicles for the Police, Recreation/ 
Parks, Cemetery and Public Works Departments. Each vehicle must be 
kept in best possible condition to insure it's availability when needed. 
During the last six months of 1975, each department was responsible 
for maintaining their own vehicles. 

All repairs to vehicles were logged; therefore, an accurate cost of opera- 
tion per vehicle can be ascertained. 



BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION: 

Stanley Eustace, Custodian 

Routine maintenace continued throughout the year. 

Through the federally funded program of CETA (Comprehensive 
Employment Training Act), the Town Hall and Annex Building interiors 
were renovated. Paint, carpet, tile and panelling were installed and many 
offices were relocated and remodeled. 

Because of the CETA employees, the cost of the entire project was cut 
in half. Special thanks go to George Bouranis, Gerald Blaisdell and Fran 
Wysocki...A JOB WELL DONE! 

TEMPORARY HELP: 

At present, there are 17 men employed by the town through the CETA 
program that are working in either the Highway Department, Forestry 
Department or at the Town Hall. 



70 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Ralph Hebert 

According to the State Building Code all places of public assembly are 
required to undergo a periodic inspection and obtain a Certificate of In- 
spection from the Building Department. Fees charged for certification vary 
and are imposed by the State. However, all fees collected are reverted to 
the Town. 

The controversy of the smoke detector has been resolved by the Building 
Code Commission. All new residential constructions are required to install 
smoke detectors which have been approved by the underwriters label and 
stamped accordingly. 





1975 


1974 


Construction Valuation 


1,575,570.30 


850,314.00 


Fees Collected 


3,504.30 


1,775.50 


Occupancy Permits Issued 


142 


14 


Certificate of Inspection 


16 





Building Permits, 






New Construction, Misc. Construction, 






Additions, Remodeling, Demolition, 






Signs, Pools and Siding 


229 


173 



WATER/SEWER DEPARTMENT 



WATER DIVISION: 

Henry Chouinard, Foreman 

New Meters Installed: 
Meters Replaced: 
Services Turned Off: 
Services Turned On: 
New Services: 
Services Discontinued: 
Hydrants Installed: 
HydrantsRemoved: 
New Water Mains Installed: 
Total Length of Mains: 

WATER SERVICES: 

Metered Services: 
Unmetered Services: 
Summer Services: 
Total Services: 



1973 


1974 


1975 


43 


44 


30 


244 


96 


149 


145 


122 


123 


164 


132 


124 


63 


34 


10 


6 


2 


2 


10 

















3,460' 


2,900' 





386,707' 


389,697' 


389,697' 


3,031 


3,063 


3,072 


142 


142 


142 


173 


173 


172 



3,346 



3,378 



3,386 



71 



WATER I SAGES: 

Dow's Reservoir: 
Brown's Well 
Winthrop Wells 
Mile Lane Well: 

Total Water Usage: 
Highest Day: 2/24/74 
Highest Day: 2/19/75 



157,073,600 
175,684,800 
115,296,500 

17,212,700 

465,276,600 



197,413,500 
94,789,000 
68,483,600 
27,580,000 

388,266,100 
2,314,000 



212,322,720 

132,181,150 

75,181,188 

32,310,000 

451,995,058 
2,797,000 



SEWER DIVISION: 

Chester Wile, Treatment Plant Operator 

•Sewage Treated Daily- 
Average (Gallons) 
•Total Sewage Treated 

(Gallons) 
New Connections 
Total Connections 
Chlorine Used (Tons) 
•Note: 1975 Figures through October 5, 1975, Only: 



542,150 


512,421 


551,885 


229,287,000 


197,885,000 


153,424,000 


62 


72 


56 


984 


1,056 


1,112 


16,125 


15.45 


15.30 




Secondary Sewage Treatment Plant, Fowler's Lane (Ipswich Chronicle) 
Completion of the entire project is anticipated for the summer of 1976. 

WATERWAYS STUDY COMMISSION 

Walter G. Petrowicz, Chairman 

The following were appointed by the Selectmen to form a new group to 
be know as The Waterways Study Commission: 

Walter Petrowicz 

Robert Todd 

Howard Womack 

Kenneth Nokes 

Charles Bayley 

Stanley Eustace 

Pierre Doucet 



72 



At the first meeting Walter Petrowicz was elected Chairman; Robert 
Todd, Vice Chairman; and Howard Womack, Clerk. 

The Board of Selectmen charged the group to study and submit a re- 
commendation relative to the waterways in the Town of Ipswich in the 
following categories: 
Controls 

Duties of Harbormaster 

Law enforcement on waterways and landings 

Moorings 
Safety and Rescue 

Speed control 

Channel markers and improvements 

Rescue gear and squads 
Rules and Regulations 

Ramps and Landings 

Right of way 

Recreation areas 

Water skiing 
Navigation and Facility Improvements 

River dredging 

Mooring area improvements 

Ramps and Landings 

Parking and access roads 

The first priority being Controls. The Commission considered the existing 
Town By-Laws and drafted a complete new set which includes the new areas 
requested by the Board of Selectmen. The final draft was completed on 
December second and submitted to the Selectmen for their review. There 
was some over-lapping of the other categories since it was the intention of 
the Commission to produce a comprehensive set of By-Laws covering the 
Ipswich waterways which could be produced and read easily by anyone 
concerned. Work on the last three categories is being continued. 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION 

Paul R. Beswick, Chairman 

1975 has been one of the most active years for the Ipswich Industrial 
Development Commission. 

Early in 1975 the Commission explored possibilities of new industries 
coming to Ipswich. Two different prospects were explored and one resulted 
in showing interest. 

The Commission also visited with some local industries to explore ways 
the Industrial Development Commission could be helpful. In at least one 
case this interest on the part of the Industrial Development Commission 
was a factor in the business deciding to remain in Ipswich. 



73 



In the summer of 1975, the O.E.D.C. office in Gloucester expressed an 
interest in supporting the Town of Ipswich for industrial development with 
a Federally funded grant. The E.D.C. and the I.D.C. Chairmen were 
consulted and the Mitchell Road site was found to be the most suitable. 
Steps were taken to apply for the grant which included the Board of Select- 
men making the formal request. Some abutting neighbors of the site protest- 
ed this application for reasons that they believed it would deteriorate their 
neighborhood. The I.D.C. held a hearing of these grievances and it resulted 
that the neighbors soon agreed that publically controlled industrial develop- 
ment was preferred over the present situation. Further the I.D.C. welcomed 
two representatives from the neighborhood to work with the I.D.C. to 
develop a study specification that included their concerns. 

In October 1975 the grant was applied for by the Selectmen, with re- 
commendation of the I.D.C. The I.D.C. chairman has met with the Conser- 
vation Commission, the Planning Board and the Selectmen to keep them 
advised of progress and to initiate preliminary discussions on areas of 
mutual interest. 

In 1975 it is expected that at least one new appointment will be made to 
the I.D.C. Also in early 1976 it is expected that the 90 day study will be 
finished and the I.D.C. will take appropriate action on those findings. Most 
likely this action will include the steps necessary to begin attracting light 
industry to Ipswich. 

A principal goal of the I.D.C. is to find new sources of tax revenue as 
well as to furnish local jobs with light, non-polluting industry. 



PLANNING BOARD 

George R. Mathey, Chairman 

During the calendar year of 1975, the Planning Board held 31 regular 
meetings and 3 hearings relative to subdivision plans. No executive ses- 
sions were held. All of the proposed subdivisions, totalling 5 building 
lots and the units to be built by the Housing Authority were approved 
with conditions. In addition approximately two dozen applications not 
requiring Planning Board approval were signed. 

In January, George Mathey succeeded George Nikas as chairman, 
and George Hayes was appointed clerk. In May, John Beagan replaced 
Mr. Nikas as a member. 

With the invaluable help of Don Gagnon, its subdivision inspector, the 
Board continued to monitor the construction of ways and utilities in the 
Herrick Acres subdivision of 17 lots and remedial work at Meadowbrook 
and Scott's Hill. We are pleased that cooperation between the inhabitants 
of the area, the Public Works Department and the Board has finally 
eliminated the vast majority of the problems of Meadowbrook. 



74 



Under the leadership of Jason Sokolov, work has begun on identifying 
sections of the zoning by-law which are contradictory or vague and which 
have created problems for the Board and the Zoning Board of Appeals. 

Work has also started, uner the guidance of George Hayes, on finding 
methods of better coordinating the related efforts of the Town Clerk, 
Zoning Board of Appeals, Board of Health, Building Inspector and Plan- 
ning Board. 

The Board continued to support the efforts of its volunteer citizens' 
Planning Advisory Committee which gathered data on existing land use 
to be used as a basis for updating the Town's master plan and for revising 
the zoning by-law and subdivision rules and regulations. Although it 
was hoped that recommendation for the master plan might be presented 
to the 1976 annual Town Meeting, the vast amount of information which 
has had to be gathered by this dedicated group, all of whom have other 
commitments, has made this unlikely. It is difficult to express adequately 
the Board's appreciation to the members of the PAC for the hard work 
and valuable time they have given to this effort thereby saving the Town 
considerable amounts of money which would otherwise have had to be 
paid to our master plan consultant, Metcalf and Eddy. Particular thanks 
should be given to Holly Scoville who acted as coordinator of and secre- 
tary to the PAC. 

The Board also wishes to thank Sally and Frank Rue and Steve White- 
sell, volunteer student interns from the University of Massachusetts, for 
there professional assistance to the PAC, the members of the Conserva- 
tion Commission without whom the PAC would have been badly under- 
staffed and less effective, and Dale Vincent, Town Counsel, for his un- 
stinting and invaluable legal advice. 

In the year to come we hope and expect that all segments of the popula- 
tion of Ipswich will continue to contribute their knowledge of the Town 
and of their particular needs and aspirations to the Planning Board so 
that a master plan which is for the good of Ipswich as a whole may be 
formulated. 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Virginia Cawthron, Chairman 

The Council on Aging, which was established by the March Town 
meeting, was organized at the October 20, 1975, meeting of the Board 
of Selectmen. 

At present there are 1600 senior citizens in Ipswich. The goal of the 
Council is to improve the social and economic conditions of all older 
Americans; to provide adequate income; comprehensive health service; 
decent housing at rents the aged can afford; improve low cost transporta- 



75 



tion; adequeate diets; property tax relief and meaningful retirement. The 
way to achieve this goal is through political action at local, State and 
Federal levels. 




IPS WICH COUNCIL ON AGING 

Left to right - Herbert Brack, Virginia Cawthron, Percy Cheverie, Linda 
Trimmer, Helen Drenth, Harold Bowen. (House ofHinlin Photo) 



76 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Seated, left to right - Mrs. Deanna Cross, Mrs. Patricia Manning, Mr. 
Paul K Gahm, Chairman, Mrs. Annette George. Standing, left to right - 
Mr. Walter J. Pojasek, Mr. Richard a Nylen, Mr. Ernest F. Brockelbank. 

(House ofHinlin Photo) 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Paul K Gahm, Chairman 

Meetings of the School Committee are held on the first and third Thurs- 
days of the month at 8:00 p.m., in various school locations as posted 
with the Town Clerk. 

The School Committee has caried through a Personnel Needs Assess- 
ment resulting in substantial reductions in staff. We have reduced school 
operating costs by leaving the rented quarters, and have spent 18 months 
in labor negotiations to protect the interests of the taxpayers and the 
children of our community. 

As we look ahead to the upcoming year, our overall concern continues. 
We are not encouraged by reduction in Chapter 70 funds, or the uncer- 
tainties of reimbursements for Chapter 766 and school transportation. 
We, therefore, will continue our vigilance in the upcoming year looking 
at ah* areas where saving can be accomplished. 

Having adopted this philosophy, it is inevitable that some programs, 
people and children will be effected. It is our hope to keep the disruptions 
minimal without sacrificing basic quality education. The School Com- 
mittee will need your support and encouragement in our efforts. With 
your understanding, we will survive the economic crunch and preserve 
the integrity of our educational program. 



77 



ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 

ENROLLMENT CHART BY GRADES 1970 - 1975 



Grade 

K 

Nongraded Primary (1970 & 1971) 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

P.G. 

Sp. Ed. 

TOTALS 



1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 



187 


164 


171 


165 


191 


156 


204 


276 










159 


97 


183 


197 


182 


188 


122 


141 


220 


198 


194 


184 


235 


185 


250 


208 


200 


181 


203 


239 


214 


242 


197 


196 


206 


210 


224 


219 


237 


191 


225 


213 


203 


232 


224 


236 


216 


228 


213 


202 


223 


220 


217 


215 


224 


214 


201 


223 


220 


213 


200 


177 


175 


171 


180 


218 


213 


171 


180 


163 


197 


177 


210 


174 


167 


173 


174 


198 


177 


180 


177 


163 


2 


1 


1 


1 




4 


27 


27 


25 


4 


8 


•5 



2774 2802 2728 2584 2556 2454 





ENROLLMENT CHART - 


OCTOBER 1, 1975 
















Sp. 




GRADE 


K 1 


2 


3 


4 5 6 7 


8 9 10 H 12 


Ed. 


Total 


Doyon 


53 59 


68 


58 


77 75 81 




5 


476 


Burley 


38 70 


48 


49 








205 


Shatswell 


32 40 


46 


49 








167 


Boone Hall 


33 19 


22 


25 








99 


Baptist 








44 






44 


Winthrop 








75 116 155 






346 


Jr. High 








220 


223 




443 


Sr. High 










171 163 173 163 




674 


TOTALS 


156 188 


184 


181 


196 191 236 220 


223 171 163 173 163 


5 


2454 



EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES 

ISSUED TO MINORS 

7/1/75 - 12/31/75 



Boys 
Girls 



Age 


Age 




14-16 


16-18 


Total 


5 


26 


31 


9 


43 


52 



78 




John H. Stella, Superintendent of Schools 



(House of Hinlin Photo) 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

John H. Stella 

A most significant decrease in enrollment occurred from October 1, 1974 
to October 1, 1975. In that period of time the public school K-12 enrollment 
was reduced by 102. On October 1, 1975 the public school enrollment was 
2454. This significant decrease in enrollment is attributed to the steadily 
declining birth rate to Ipswich residents. It is interesting to note that in 1967 
there were 251 births to Ipswich residents. In 1971 there were 149 births to 
Ipswich residents, and in the year 1975, 107 children were born to Ipswich 
residents. The result of the decreasing birth is reflected in declining enroll- 
ments in all levels; specifically at the K-6 levels in 1969, our total K-6 en- 
rollment numbered 1586. In 1975 our K-6 enrollment numbered 1356. The 
most dramatic degree occurring from 1974-1975; there were 93 less K-6 
students. 



79 



Table of Births 
Year Number of Births 

1967 251 

1971 149 

1975 107 



K-6 Enrollment 

year K-6 Enrollment 

1969 1586 

1972 1486 

1975 1356 

The School Committee, in the spring of 1975, charged the School Ad- 
ministration with the most important task of conducting a Staff Needs 
Assessment at all levels. This assignment included all employees of the 
school system. In the spring of 1975, the School Committee approved 
several reductions in force at the High School level. 

It appears that with decreasing enrollments several reductions in force 
will have to be made during the upcoming Budget Sessions in preparation 
of the 1976-77 School Budget. 

On October 1, 1975, Ipswich students enrolled in the Whittier Regional 
Vocational Technical High School totalled 146. This is the highest number 
of students that we have had in the school since it became operational. It 
appears that expenditures for Ipswich students attending Ipswich schools 
can be decreased, particularly in the area of personnel for the 1976-77 school 
year. The Administration will propose to the School Committee reductions 
in force for the upcoming budget. 

The reports from the Principals of the schools and the Supervisors list 
the accomplishments of the last year and the progress of the school. 

I extend to the members of the School Committee my sincere appreciation 
for the many hours they spend for Ipswich education. 

I extend to the Administrators, Teachers, Custodians, Secretaries, Caf- 
eteria workers and all others, my sincere appreciation for their excellent 
cooperation. Finally, I extend to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, 
Police, Highway, Fire Department, and other Town Officials, my sincere 
appreciation for their excellent cooperation with the schools. 



80 




PUBLIC SCHOOLS SUPER VISORS 

Left to right - Samuel B. Levy, Winthr op-Baptist Schools Principal; 
Mrs. Lyn Huttunen, Director of Curriculum; John E. Huttunen, Ralph 
C. Whipple Memorial Junior High School Principal; Joseph R. Rogers, 
High School Principal; Joseph J. Battaglio, Pupil Personnel Services 
Director; Mrs. MarciaJ. Fowler, Burley-Shatswell and Boone Hall Principal; 
William E. Waitt, Jr., Doyon School Principal. (House ofHinlin Photo) 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Joseph R. Rogers, Principal 

Enrollment as of October 1 , 1976 -674 

The decline in pupil enrollment has caused the administration and the 
staff to reassess our needs and direction. The reduction in population 
coupled with larger numbers of pupils going to Whittier Regional Voc 
Tech has resulted in some restructuring in our curriculum. Specialty 
courses with small numbers of pupils will be eliminated next year be- 
cause of cost. Unfortunately some of these will be in the fine arts. 

The general curriculum is returning to a far more structured program 
than was offered to our pupils during the early 70's. We are concentrating 
more on required courses in English, Math, Science, U.S. History and 
U.S. Geography. 

Our business department has a four year sequential course offering 
which is definitely career and occupation oriented. The remainder of 
our program is in general education and preparation for a college career. 



81 



Our program for graduating early, i.e.; in 3 years or 3Vi years is being 
opted for by many students. This is in part due to economics or lack 
of money for college tuition - many students work for one year prior to 
entering the collegiate scene. 

There are larger numbers of students going in to the military which 
is another indication of the economic recession still being with us. 

In November our school underwent a 3 day evaluation by the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges. This process is to determine 
our accreditation as a public secondary school. At this writing we have 
not received notification of the extension of our accreditation. 

Chapter 766 has added a new dimension to our curriculum. While 
we were providing every opportunity possible to accomodate every young- 
ster, regardless of a physical or emotional disability we now must make 
greater provisions. This is being done by aides and special teachers and a 
back up force of non-instructional personnel. This new dimension has 
caused us to divide two rooms to provide smaller spaces to accomodate 
small group instruction and counseling. However, lack of space is still 
a problem. 

In conclusion: we are returning to a more structured basic program of 
studies to fill the needs of our secondary school population. 



RALPH C. WHIPPLE MEMORIAL 
JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

John E. Huttunen, Principal 

Enrollment 

The enrollment figures for the 1975-1976 school year are as follows: 

Grade 7 220 

Grade_8 228 

TOTAL 448 

While projected enrollment figures show a possible decrease at other 
levels, our enrollment will increase for the 1976-1977 school year - again. 

Programs and Courses 

As a result of Chapter 622 of the Massachusetts state laws course offerings 
and programs can no longer be established in such a manner as to discrimin- 
ate because of sex, color, etc. Accordingly, home economics for girls and 
wood shop for boys can no longer be offered as we traditionally have 
organized them. This year we have scheduled seventh grade students to take 
one half a year shop and one half a year of home economics. When these 



82 



students progress to the eighth grade they will choose either home economics 
or shop and classes will be co-educational. 

Our current eighth grade pupils chose to take either shop or home econom- 
ics at the half way point of this school year and the classes were organized 
on a co-educational basis. Interestingly, thirty five percent (35%) of the 
boys chose to take home economics when given the option and only fifteen 
percent (15970) of the girls chose wood shop. In addition, our physical 
education program and classes are now organized so that they can be co- 
educational for the majority of activities. 

In cooperation with the personnel of the Pupil Personnel Department we 
have established a learning center in a portion of the area formerly utilized 
by our guidance counselors. Supplementary learning activities are being 
provided for our students requiring special needs assistance. Miss Temple 
and Mr. Sigman are available in the learning center to assist students and to 
work with our classroom teachers. 

Building and Grounds 

During the summer of 1975 new fluorescent lights were installed in our 
corridors and painting of stairways was completed. Hopefully we plan to 
start a three (3) year program to install new student lockers during the 1976- 
1977 budget year. Our present lockers have been in the school since 1936 
and are in poor condition with replacement parts unavailable. 

In conclusion, I would like to thank the superintendent, school com- 
mittee, and community for the support offered to the Junior High stu- 
dents and staff. 

PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

William E. Waitt, Jr., Principal 

This year marks the tenth anniversary of the Doyon School in service to 
the Town of Ipswich. The students, staff and I take pride not only in the 
excellent condition of the building, but in the continued fine educational 
program made possible by its very adequate facilities. 

As principal, I wish to renew my thanks for the first ten years to those 
who worked so hard to make this school possible. To George Geanakos, 
the late Chairman of the School Committee, for the inspiration; to Rodney 
R. Wood, late Superintendent of Schools for the leadership, and to the 
School Construction Committee for the hard work, with James C. Mc- 
Manaway and Harris Smith as Chairmen, including members, Lawrence 
Adams, Edwin H. Damon, Jr., Richard W. Davis, Joseph McGee, Phillip 
Pattison and Catherine Pojasek. 

We remain dedicated to the memory of Paul F. Doyon and continue to 
provide service to the community by making the building and grounds 
available to a large number of citizen activities. 



83 



Organization We Continue to be the only school that houses seven 
grades of education, with grades Kindergarten through Six. Each grade 
level has three sections, with three Learning Centers, devoted to helping 
students with special needs as required under Chapter 766. School enroll- 
ment from January to June averaged 542 students. September showed a 
surprising drop in enrollment to 480 students, with official October 1st. 
figure at 476. 

Curriculum Doyon provides a standard curriculum with emphasis on the 
basic skills of Reading, Language Arts and Mathematics, supplemented 
with instruction in Science, Music, Art and Physical Education. 

Considerable emphasis is placed on good school citizenship and respect 
for each other. 

The staff continues to work on individualizing the curriculum so that 
each child may make maximum use of his capabilities. 

Personnel Doyon has a staff of 35 full and part time professionals, 
including 23 tenure teachers, 3 tenure candidates, 7 second year teachers 
and 2 first year staff members. In addition, two members are on leave of 
absence. 

A service staff of 19 include 8 kitchen employees, 3 teacher aides, 3 part 
time lunch aides, 2 full time custodians, 1 part time custodian, a nurse and 
a school secretary. 

General The work of the school is greatly assisted by a number of volun- 
teers who work within the classrooms as aides and tutors, and our school 
library. We are indebted to them. 

Parents continue to provide advice and counsel in our monthly Parent 
Advisory group meetings. 

Our cafeteria continues to provide hot lunches to the Burley, Shatswell, 
and Boone Hall School via our carry out program. 



WINTHROP and BAPTIST SCHOOLS 

Samuel B. Levy, Principal 

The Winthrop-Baptist Schools houses three classes of grade four; five 
of grade five and six of grade six at the Winthrop School and two classes 
of grade four at the Baptist School. At the end of the year Winthrop had 
349 students and the Baptist School 43 students. The Winthrop Resource 
Center serves both of the schools and includes a well stocked library with 
reference works, general reading materials and film, audio and visual 
material for use by individuals, group or entire classroom work. A shared 
librarian and a large corps of dedicated volunteer workers supervise the 
center's operation. 

The school day is 6 hours and 15 minutes. Class "A" lunches are served 
in the Winthrop Cafeteria for Winthrop and Baptist students. Bus trans- 
portation is provided for one-half of the student body. 



84 



The school provides a standard elementary school curriculum with a 
flexible structure. Imaginative and innovative approaches are employed to 
enliven the students' interest in their education and their environment. 
Specialists operate in the areas of art, music and physical education. In- 
strumental music lessons are provided for the three grades. An active chorus 
of over eighty girls and twenty boys meet weekly. The Grade 5 and 6 Band 
has sixty-five members. Jhe Grade 4 Beginning Band has forty-five members. 
Provisions are made for students in the area of learning disabilities and 
speech therapy. A Title I ESEA Project provides for a Director and trained 
teacher aides to work in the area of remedial reading and mathematics. 
The Title I Parents Advisory Council is an active and important part of 
this project. The Winthrop-Baptist Parent Advisory Council which meets 
monthly in an active and interesting part of the school program. 

In addition to the classroom teachers, the staff includes vocal music, 
instrumental music and art specialists, a full-time physical education teacher, 
a part-time librarian, two full-time learning disabilities specialists, a part- 
time guidance counselor, a full-time guidance counselor, a consulting 
psychologist, a part-time speech therapist and a part-time occupational 
therapist. A nurse, a secretary, two full-time custodians, two lunchroom 
aides and three cafeteria workers complete the staff. 

Many of the members are actively in post graduate work and in area 
committees and boards in various areas of education, guidance and envir- 
onmental activities. The entire staff is involved in scheduled workshops in 
the area of curriculum development in the various disciplines. 

Many civic, private and church groups avail themselves of the op- 
portunity to use our facilities and equipment after school, evenings and 
on week-ends. During the entire year, including the summer, our kitchen 
facilities were used by CAPE (Cape Ann Program for the Elderly) who 
prepared and served meals under this program. 



BURLEY, SHATSWELL AND 
BOONE HALL SCHOOLS 

Marcia J. Fowler, Principal 

Enrollment 

Burley School 205 

Shatswell School 167 

Boone Hall School 99 



85 





Personnel 


Classroom Teachers 




19 


Librarian 




1 


Art Teachers 




2 part time 


Music Teachers 




2 part time 


Nurse 




1 part time 


Physical Education 




1 


Specific Learning Disabilities 




Teachers 




2 


Learning Center Teacher 


1 


Guidance Counselor 




1 full time 1 part time 


Secretary 




1 


Clerical Aide 




1 


Custodians 




2/2 


Principal 




1 




Organization 




Burley 


Shatswell Boone Hall 


Kindergarten 


2 sessions 


2 sessions 2 sessions 


Grade 1 


3 


2 1 


Grade 2 


2 


2 1 


Grade 3 


2 


2 1 



At the primary level, basic academic, physical and social development 
skills are stressed. While classes are self-contained and graded children are 
assigned learning tasks which are appropriate for their individual level of 
development. Consequently, in the various disciplines, each child begins 
at his level of readiness and progresses at his most efficient rate to whatever 
heights he can reach throughout the school year. Individual strengths, 
weaknesses and interests are carefully assessed. Appropriate instructional 
materials and teaching styles are then initiated to ensure maximum growth. 

Parent-teacher conferences are scheduled at least twice during the year 
to report child progress and enhance communications between the home 
and the school. 



DIRECTOR OF CURRICULUM 

Lyn Huttunen 

The 1975 school year was an especially active one in the area of curriculum 
development. Priorities were established in subject matter areas and the 
thrust toward better communication and a coordinated K-12 program of 
studies continued throughout the year. 

Under the title of Special Projects, groups of representative teachers and 
administrators accomplished the following: 



86 



(1.) An individualized language arts record-keeping system and related 

learning objectives for grades K-3. 
(2.) Curriculum guides in United States History for grades 5, 8, and 9 
(3.) An integrated social studies-science curriculum guide for Kindergarten 

Children. 
(4.) An in-depth study of Ipswich and early craftspersons for children in 

grade 2. 
(5.) Project Adventure (a unique physical education and related science 

program) for sophomores and upperclasspersons on an elective basis. 
(6.) A resource manual of units, activities and community representatives 

for high school students taking the "Math Everyone Can Use" course. 
(7.) A totally individualized laboratory approach to mathematics for 

students in grades 7 and 8. 
(8.) An integrated resource manual to accompany the objectives and record- 
keeping system utilized in math with students in grades 4-6. 
(9.) A Career Fair for elementary grade students, a Career Day at the High 

School and a Career Steering Committee to establish appropriate 

programs at the Junior High. 
(10.) Professional performances for students in the areas of music, dance 

and theater arts with an emphasis on the Bicentennial. 

Ipswich competed again for Federal monies and was very successful in 
attaining the following: 

(1) Title I, ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) - Ipswich 
received $30,485 for a project designed specifically to meet the needs 
of children in remedial reading, grades 3-6 and in remedial and advanced 
math, grades 5-8. Mrs. Bette Siegel and Mrs. Cynthia Burns, community 
representatives, have provided excellent leadership in this area. 

(2) Title II, ESEA - Guaranteed local support has provided us with an 
additional $2,954.90 for library and media materials at the elementary 
school level. 

(3) Title III, ESEA - Ipswich was the recipient of one of only twenty project 
grants awarded in the State for innovative programs. Our program en- 
titled "Ipswich Environmental and Civic Action Project" provides in- 
depth experiences for students in the areas of social studies and science. 
An award of $44,900 has provided us with a fifteen passenger van for 
educational field trips and sophisticated science and photographic 
equipment for student use. 

(4) Title III, NDEA (National Defense Education Act) - A grant of $6,000 
(50% local funds/50% reimbursed Federal funds) provided science 
materials for use in environmental and oceanography courses at the high 
school. 

Curriculum is never stagnant. It must continuously be revised and changed 
in order to meet the needs of our students. The support of teachers, ad- 
ministrators, our school superintendent and representatives from the 
community has helped us to take positive action in improving our programs. 



87 



PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Joseph J. Battaglio, Director 

Now in the second year of implementation, Chapter 766 continues to 
have serious implications for cities, towns and their school systems. Ipswich, 
like other communities is caught between two opposing alternatives. It 
must provide services to children mandated under the law, and it must at 
the same time cope with an avalanche of procedural and bureaucratic 
requirements which impede the delivery of those services. The pupil ser- 
vices staff is under mounting pressure to meet requirements for assess- 
ments, evaluations, program development, monitoring and review for 
even.- child referred under Chapter 766. The guidance staff, as coordinators 
for the process in their respective schools, has undergone a major change 
in role and function; but the effects on special needs teachers, specialists, 
consultants and the health team have also been severe. 

Numbers of children in special programs has risen from approximately 
264 (special needs census, November 1974) to 370 as of June 1975. The 
increased demand for services represented by these figures is obvious, 
but the corresponding demand for the procedural work described above 
must also be met. The special needs staffs at learning and resource centers 
are facing impossible numbers of children requiring services. The same is 
true of specialists like the occupational therapist. Our priority is to pro- 
vide these services. The problem is how to provide them adequately, 
while at the same time complving with the non-service aspects of Chapter 
766. 

Staff increase requests will be minimal and aimed at alleviating existing 
programs where pressure is most critical. No new programs are anticipated 
at this time. The space problem dispite reduced enrollments system wide 
remains severe. Children in need of services at Burley School are in 
most cases transfered to overcrowded programs in other schools. Speech 
therapy, physical therapy, health and other services compete for space with 
other school activities. 

The outlook is uncertain: Ipswich, as it always has, will meet its responsi- 
bility to children. Appropriate services for all children remains our priority. 
I am confident — and grateful — for town support expressed through 
the School Committee for this priority. But a more reasonable stance 
with respect to non-service aspects of Chapter 766 on the pan of the State 
is very much needed. 

SCHOOL BUILDING 
NEEDS COMMITTEE 

William Craft, Chairman 

Following last year's unsuccessful vote on the proposal for a new ele- 



88 



mentary school, the S.B.N.C. sponsored a well publicized public forum 
involving the Selectmen, Finance Committee and School Committee. 
The focus of this forum was a consideration of the facilities problems 
facing Ipswich schools and practical plans for addressing them. 

It was generally agreed that in their present condition The Burley and 
Shatswell Schools are substandard at best, and continue to represent 
the most critical of many problems facing the public schools. It was further 
agreed that, at the present time no practical strategy could be identified 
which would lead to a correction of any of these problems. 

For the near future, it is apparent that town action regarding school 
facilities will be limited to maintenance and repair of existing buildings. 
The committee has continued to contribute to the long range planning 
activities sponsored by various other town groups and committees. In 
addition, the committee serves as the formal link with the State Depart- 
ment of Education's Bureau of School Building Assistance. 



89 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

POLICE EMERGENCY 356-4343 

FIRE EMERGENCY 356-4321 



Be sore to give your name and address as well as the nature of your emergency 
clearly. Do Not hang up until you are sure that your message has been understood. 



FOR ANSWERS ON: 

Assessments 

Payment of Taxes 

Payment of Water Bills 

Billing, Water 

Birth, Death, Marriage Certificates 

Building 

Cemeteries 

Civil Defense 

Dog Information 

Education Information 

Elections, Voting, Registration 

Electric 

Engineering 

Fire, Routine 

Health, Sanitation, Rubbish, Garbage 

Highway and Street 

Library 

Licensing Authority 

Licenses: Dog, Hunting, Fishing 

Oil Burner Permits 

Permits for Burning 

Permits for Dumping 

Recreation 

Schools 



Sewer 

Veteran's Service 
Water Problems 
Youth 



CALL THE: TELEPHONE: 

Assessor's Office (Annex) 356-4010 

Treasurer/Collector (Annex) 356-3100 

Treasurer/Collector (Annex) 356-3100 

Billing Office (Annex) 356-4830 

Town Clerk's Office (Annex). . . . 356-4161 

Building Inspector (Annex) 356-4900 

Cemetery Superintendent 356-3933 

Jr. High School 356-4342 

Dog Pound 356-0588 

School Superintendent 356-2935 

Town Clerk's Office (Annex) 356-4161 

Electric Light Department 356-4331 

Water/Sewer Office (Annex) .... 356-5592 

Fire Department 356-4322 

Board of Health Office (Annex) . 356-4900 
Public Works Office (Town Hall) . 356-5591 

Librarian 356-4646 

Board of Selectmen (Town Hall) . 356-2262 

Town Clerk's Office (Annex) 356-4161 

Fire Chief 356-4322 

Fire Department 356-4322 

Board of Health Office (Annex) . 356-4900 

Recreation/Parks Office 356-3767 

Burley School 356-2666 

High School 356-3137 

Junior High School 356-3535 

Doyon School 356-5506 

Shatswell School 356-2312 

Winthrop School 356-2976 

Nurse 356-5507 

, 356-3535 

Water/Sewer Office (Annex) 356-5592 

Veteran's Agent (Town Hall) 356-3915 

Water/Sewer Office (Annex) .... 356-5592 
Drop In Center .* 356-0312 



MEETINGS 

Annual Town Meeting 
Annual Town Election 
Conservation Commission 
Finance Committee 
Board of Health 
Library Trustees 
Planning Board 
Recreation & Parks Com. 



DAY & TIME 

1st Mon. in May 
2nd Mon. in May 
1st& 3rd Thurs. ea. mo. 
1st Wed. ea. mo. 
2nd Thurs. ea. mo. 
3rd Mon. ea. mo. 
Every other Tues. 
2nd Wed. ea. mo. 



PLACE 

High School 
Precinct Polling Place 
Town Hall 
Payne School 
Town Hall 
Library 
Town Hall 
Memorial Building 



90 



School Committee 
Selectmen 

Historical Commission 
Cemetery Commission 
Housing Authority 
Shellfish Advisory Com. 
Youth Commission 
Board of Assessors 
Economic/lndust. Dev. Com. 
Council on Aging 
Waterways Study Committee 



1st & 3rd Thurs. ea. mo. 

Every Monday 

2nd & 4th Wed. ea. mo. 

1st Fri.ea. mo. 

2nd Tues. ea. mo. 

3rd Tues. ea. mo. 

2nd & 4th Tues. ea. mo. 

Every Monday 

4th Mon. ea. mo. 

1st Wed. ea. mo. 

1st Tues. ea. mo. 



To Be Announced 

Court Room 

Town Hall 

Cemetery Off ice 

Community Bldg./Caroline Ave. 

Town Hall 

Drop In Center 

Town Hall Annex 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 



IPSWICH AT A GLANCE 



Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts in Essex County 

Founded 1633- Incorporated 1634 

Ipswich is in the 6th Congressional District 

Our Representative is Michael J. Harrington (D) 

Ipswich is in the 3rd Senatorial District 

Our Senator is William L Saltonstall (R) 

Ipswich is in the 2nd Essex District 

Our Representative in General Court is David J. Lane (R) 

The Annual Town Meeting is on the first Monday in May at the High School 

The Annual Elections are the second Monday in May at each Precinct Place 



Government: 

Location: 

Area: 

Geographical 

Center: 

Population: 

Transportation: 

Tax Rate: 

Total Value: 

Fire Department: 

Police Department: 

Water: 

Sewer: 

Electricity: 

Gas: 

Recreational 

Facilities: 



Selectmen/Town Manager Charter - New England Town 

Meeting 

Centrally Located on Massachusetts' North Shore - 35 Miles 

N.E. of Boston - Driving Time 45 minutes 

33.35 Square miles - 21 ,344 acres 

Pedrick House, corner of Jeffrey' Neck Road and Ocean Drive 
11,551(1975) 

Boston & Maine R.R. - Frequent Rail service - Train time to 
Boston 50 min. U.S. Route 1, U.S. Route 1A-Harbor Facilities - 
Taxi Service 

$66.00 All homes are assessed at approximately 65% of fair 
market value 

1975 Real Estate $71,017,616 - Personal Property $2,031,341 
(Total $73,048,957) - Number of Accounts, Approximately 5,740 
Full-time 18 man force - 33 call man force - equipment in- 
cludes one 100' Aerial ladder truck 

Full-time 20 man force - 24 man auxiliary force - 3 radio 
equipped cruisers - 1 inspector 
To most of Town 
To part of Town 
Municipal Plant to whole Town 
To 75% of Town To 75% of Town 

Supervised Playgrounds - Summer Swimming Instructions - 



91 



Zoning: 

Housing: 
Schools: 



Churches: 
Medical Facilities: 

Shopping: 



Public Library: 

Health: 

News: 

Industry: 



Tennis Courts - Softball Diamonds - Baseball Diamonds • 
Public Beaches on Seashore - Ponds for Ice Skating (some 
are lighted) - 9 hole Golf Course - Boat Club - Yacht Club 

- Wildlife Sanctuary - Salt & Fresh Water Fishing - Movie 
Theatre - 16 Lane Bowling Alley - Pool & Billiards - Golden 
Age Club - Teen Drop in Center 

Protection by adequate zoning and planning regulations 
insures controlled growth of residential, commercial and 
industrial areas. 

3 Projects (144 units providing for low income families and 
Elderly Citizens) 

4 Elementary Schools (2 Auxiliary Buildings) - Jr. High School 

- High School - Pupil/Teacher Ratio 13.6/1 - Special Classes for 
Retarded or emotionally disturbed educable - Classes for 
Perceptually handicapped - Kindergartens - Regional Vo- 
Tech High School - Comprehensive program of evening 
classes for adults 

2 Baptist - 3 Catholic - 1 Christian Science - 1 Congregational 

- 1 Episcopal - 1 Greek Orthodox - 1 Methodist 

12 Physicians - 6 Dentists - 45 Bed Hospital - Visiting Nurses 

- Convalescent Homes - Ambulance Service - 2 Pharmacies 
....(2 Veterinarians) 

Good Facilities in Center of Town - Shopping Center - Antique 
Shops - Apparel Stores - Auto Body & Supply Shops - Banks 

- Beauty Shops (Barber Shops & Hair Stylists) - Building 
Supplies - Cleaners - Gift Shops - Grocery Stores (fruit & 
vegetable stands) - Hardware Stores - Jewelers - Laundro- 
mats - Pharmacies - Restaurants - Service Stations - Sport 
Shops - Variety Stores and many more 

54,500 volume library - open 6 days a week - Micro filmed 
data- Audio/Visual Equipment 

Dump open 7 days a week - Rubbish Collection Weekly - 
Garbage Collection Weekly in winter, twice in summer 
Two Weekly Newspapers - Represented in three daily papers 

- Represented by 2 radio stations 

Sylvania - Five Major Shellfish Plants - Monument Manu- 
facturing - Several Woodworking establishments 



92 



WIS 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 2122 00162 128 7 

IN MEMORIAM 



Robert Wile, Sr. 
A uxiliary Police 
January 31, 1975 



William V. Arsenault 

Park & Recreation 

May 16, 1975 




.# m 



&e*» 



"-■ ■■« % 




Charles Merritt 

Special Police 

October 26, 1975 



Ipswich Public Library 

Ipswich, Massachusetts 




m 



BY THE MARTIN PRINTING CORPORATION